HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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An action plan to lessen the risk of or prevent heart disease involves making time to take care of yourself. You can also:



Recognize the symptoms of a heart attack in women are different from symptoms seen in men. They include chest pain (heavy ache or pressure); pain in the arms, neck, jaw, back or upper stomach; shortness of breath; breaking out in a cold sweat; unusual or unexplained tiredness; feeling dizzy or light-headed; or feeling sick to your stomach. Call 911 if you suspect you or a loved one is suffering from a heart attack.

WORKING TO HAVE A HEALTHY HEART:

JEAN JEFFERS

Jean is an RN with an MSN from University of Cincinnati. She is a staff writer for Living Well 60+ and Health & Wellness magazines. Her blog may be seen on her website at www.normajan.naiwe.com

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to flow more easily to the heart), the arteries will remain damaged and you are more likely to have a heart attack — or a second heart attack. Because this condition will only worsen, it is vitally important to take action to prevent and control the disease process.


Certain risk factors make a woman more likely to develop heart disease. Some of them are easily dealt with. You can do something about smoking, elevated blood pressure, high blood cholesterol levels, being overweight and inactive and diabetes. Research indicates more than 95 percent of those who die from heart disease have at least one of these major risk factors. Age is another risk factor after menopause.


To take action to prevent heart disease, it’s necessary to make lifestyle changes. Research shows women can reduce their heart disease risk by as much as 82 percent simply by leading a healthy lifestyle, and adopting heart-healthy habits may add years to your life, even for those who already have heart disease.  

Are you working to have a healthy heart? Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Twenty-three percent of women will die within a year after having a heart attack. Fortunately, you can do something to avoid being one of the statistics.


Protection against heart disease is particularly important once a woman reaches midlife because after menopause, her risk of heart disease and heart attack jumps significantly. One in eight women between the ages of 45 and 64 years have some form of heart disease, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.


Heart disease occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle become hardened and narrowed due to a build-up of plaque in the arteries’ inner walls. Plaque is an accumulation of fat, cholesterol and other substances. As it builds up in the arteries, blood flow to the heart is reduced.


Heart disease may lead to a heart attack, when one or more of the coronary arteries is totally blocked, preventing oxygen and nutrients from getting to the heart. This could cause permanent damage to the heart. Other diseases of the heart and blood vessel system include stroke, high blood pressure and rheumatic heart disease.


Once you have heart disease, no matter the treatment you receive, such as bypass surgery and/or angioplasty (treatments that allow blood