HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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Always see your physician for an evaluation before making a determination as to why your stomach hurts. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says food poisoning can cause an upset stomach, cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and fever. It can take hours or days to have symptoms after consuming a contaminated food or drink. If you think you may have food poisoning, it is important to drink fluids to prevent dehydration. To avoid food poisoning, do not wash raw poultry or meat before thoroughly cooking it and use a thermometer to check the temperature. Refrigerate leftovers at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or colder within two hours of preparation. Cook eggs until the yolks and whites are firm, and do not eat raw batter or dough. Never eat raw or undercooked fish or shellfish. Seafood should always be cooked to 145 degrees Fahrenheit and leftover seafood should be reheated to 165 degrees Fahrenheit.


Some stomach issues are more concerning than others. “Known collectively as inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis affects one in 100 Americans,” said Rebecca Kaplan, public affairs and social media manager for the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation. “They are painful diseases that attack the digestive system.” It is important to be in tune to your body and recognize any

WINTER IS A PRIME TIME FOR TUMMY TROUBLES

JAMIE LOBER

Jamie Lober is a Staff Writer for Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by Jamie Lober

changes. “Symptoms may include abdominal pain, persistent diarrhea, rectal bleeding, fever and weight loss,” said Kaplan. “Many patients require numerous hospitalizations and surgery.”


The disease usually develops between ages 15 and 35 years but it is rising in adults over age 65 years as well. “The two main goals of treating inflammatory bowel disease are achieving remission or absence of symptoms and maintaining remission or preventing flare-ups,” said Kaplan. Treatment is individualized. “If you or a loved one are experiencing symptoms that could be Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, be sure to see a doctor as soon as possible,” said Kaplan.

The American Academy of Pediatrics says children can have recurrent abdominal pain just as adults. Causes can include overeating, gas, constipation, food intolerance, intestinal infections, food poisoning, urinary tract infections, appendicitis and serious medical conditions.


“Stomach issues can be anything from gastroenteritis to something going on in the abdomen to something psychosocial happening in a child’s life,” said Dr. Kraig Humbaugh, commissioner of health and pediatrician with the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department.


Winter can be a particularly tough time for tummy troubles. “No. 1 would be infectious diseases like viruses that cause vomiting, diarrhea or upset stomach. They are common especially at this time of year,” said Humbaugh.


Stomach issues do not discriminate. “Viruses unfortunately hit all of us,” said Humbaugh. The best prevention is to wash your hands well and thoroughly before preparing meals or after going to the bathroom or diapering a child. “Hand sanitizers can be helpful but they are not a substitute for good old-fashioned hand washing,” Humbaugh said. “If you are out in a field, hand sanitizers can be an option but they do not always control all the bugs as well as washing your hands does, especially if your hands are visibly dirty.”