HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

subscribe to Health & Wellness

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | BLOG | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT


who are addicted start to reject their friends and family, preferring to hang out with other people who are addicted or who seem to encourage or support their addictive habits.


What can you do if you suspect a friend or a loved one has an addiction? Your first instinct may be to try to make them get help. But in most cases, a person with an addiction must want to change for recovery to be successful. It has to be their choice. Be as supportive and involved as possible. Attending self-help meetings and support groups with your loved one or on your own can be very helpful. If the person decides to get treatment, encourage them to stick with the program they choose. But also be aware relapses are common, so prepare yourself for that possibility.


Sources:




WHAT IS ADDICTION?

Left untreated, an addiction can grow worse over time and lead to chronic illness, incarceration and even death.


The most common drug addictions are nicotine, which is found in tobacco; opioids (narcotics) or pain relievers; and alcohol. According to Addiction.com, people can also be addicted to coffee or caffeine, gambling, sex and/or pornography, food and even technology.


Addiction is most often signaled by an impaired ability to maintain self-control. A person fighting an addiction finds it impossible to stop their behavior even though they may realize their addiction is causing numerous problems. There are other signs of addiction, such as secrecy, theft or deception (lying about drug use). Health- related symptoms include insomnia or memory loss. Other physical changes may include bloodshot or glazed eyes, unexplained injuries, an abrupt change in weight (loss or gain), bad teeth (especially with drugs such as methamphetamines) and slurred speech. Changes in appearance, personality, mood or behavior are also telltale signs of addictive disorder, including increased levels of anxiety and depression, a lack of interest in hobbies or activities the person formerly enjoyed, neglecting relationships and missing work. Some people

A standard definition of addiction is: The fact or condition of being addicted to a particular substance, thing or activity. That definition doesn’t seem to go far enough. Everyone undoubtedly has something they like a lot, but addiction takes that liking to the extreme of obsession or even developing a physical need. One in three people in the world have an addiction of some sort. Someone who is addicted can’t stay away from the addictive substance or stop the addictive behavior under their own power. The addicted person usually requires more and more of the substance or behavior to attain the sought-after high.


According to Healthline.com, an addiction is “a chronic dysfunction of the brain system that involves reward, motivation and memory.” It’s about the way your body craves a substance or behavior, especially if it causes a compulsive or obsessive pursuit of reward and a lack of concern over consequences. In the case of an addiction, a person will typically react negatively when they don’t get their reward. They can experience physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms such as severe headaches, nausea and irritability.


Addiction isn’t a weakness or a character flaw. It is an illness. It can have very real, very devastating consequences. Drug and alcohol addiction costs the United States around $420 billion annually in health care costs, criminal justice system costs and economic productivity losses. Addiction often affects many areas of a person’s life. It disrupts or even destroys daily life and relationships. It wreaks havoc on health and finances. It can create a tiring cycle of relapse and remission.