STAYING FIT AND HEALTHY DURING THE HOLIDAYS

With the holidays coming up, the highlight for many people during this season is gathering with family and friends and enjoying favorite holiday treats. Here are some tips that will help you enjoy your holidays to the fullest while not increasing your waistline.

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MAKING AND KEEPING NEW YEARS RESOLUTIONS

Only 8 percent of individuals achieved their resolutions in 2016, according to Statistic Brain. This is likely due to most people having unrealistic expectations about the speed, ease and consequences of the resolutions they make. People attempting self-change rarely succeed the first time; most need five or six attempts, according to a paper published in American Psychologist by Janet Polivy and Peter Herman. The authors suggest false hope syndrome is the cause for failure.

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HEALTHY HOLIDAY OPTIONS

The holidays are a wonderful time to gather with family and friends to celebrate. These celebrations often consist of many delicious treats and hardy meals. You can still maintain a healthy diet with a little thought and planning in advance. Research from a recent Web-based survey found 18 percent of people feel they cannot eat healthily during the holidays because they don’t want to miss out on their favorite foods. You can still eat the foods you enjoy this season, just in moderation.

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surgeries in the United States. It has been perfected in recent years and is considered a safe, reliable treatment for cataracts. However, just like with any surgery, there are risks, including infection and bleeding. After surgery, you must keep your eyes clean and avoid touching them. You must also use the eye drops prescribed for a certain amount of time.


Retinal detachment sometimes occurs after cataract surgery. One symptom of retinal detachment is the presence of flashes of light or floaters. If these symptoms occur, see an eye care specialist immediately. This is a medical emergency, and treatment is needed at once. It could save your vision.

“It’s all in the eye of the beholder,” or so the saying goes. Cataracts obstruct the vision of the beholder. But the condition may be markedly improved by a simple surgical procedure.


As Americans age, some conditions develop that must be treated to live well. One of those is cataracts. A cataract may be present in one or both eyes.


What happens with cataracts? A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye. According to the National Eye Institute (NEI) (https://nei.nih.gov), light passes through the transparent lens to the retina. Once it reaches the retina, light is changed into signals that are sent to the brain. The lens must be clear for the retina to pick up images. If the lens is cloudy, it forms a cataract, and images will be blurred.


The lens rests behind the iris and the pupil. It works like a camera, sending light to the retina in the back of the eye where an image is picked up. The lens also adjusts the eye’s focus. It is composed of water and protein. As we age, changes occur in the texture of the lens. Protein clumps together and begins to cloud a portion of the lens. This develops into a cataract. As time passes, the cataract enlarges and clouds more of the lens, thus making it harder to see. This is when cataract surgery is generally indicated.   

WHAT ARE CATARACTS?

JEAN JEFFERS

Jean Jeffers is an RN with an MSN from the University of Cincinnati. She is a staff writer for Living Well 60+ and Health & Wellness magazines. She has been published in magazines such as Christian Living in the Mature Years.

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Who is at risk for a cataract? The incidence of cataract occurs more often as people grow older. Other risk factors include diseases such as diabetes, some medications, some personal behaviors, such as smoking, and environmental factors. According to the NEI, cataract symptoms include:



Symptoms of cataracts may initially be improved with the use of new glasses, brighter lighting, anti-glare sunglasses or a magnifying glass. Gradually these aids lose their effectiveness and surgery is needed to correct the vision. The NEI says cataracts need to be removed when they interfere with daily activities, such as driving, reading or watching TV. Waiting a significant amount of time before having surgery does not cause long-term damage to your eyes or make the procedure more difficult. Cataract surgery is one of the most common