YOGA FOR ANY AGE

Yoga is an activity that is appropriate for all ages. This article discusses a few benefits of yoga, makes some recommendations for how you might practice and offers tips to get the most out of your time.

There are numerous benefits of yoga. Here are just a few.....


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TMJ AND TENSION RELIEF

In the root of your jaw, a tight aching sensation throbs subtly … or not so subtly. Tender to the touch, the sensation moves into your temples or perhaps your ear or into your face. You may or may not feel a clicking or locking in the joint of the jaw. Does any of this sound familiar for you?  You may have temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder (TMJD). Good news: This is generally temporary and can be self-treated. Talk to a health care practitioner for recommendations tailored to your own needs...

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VISUALIZATION WITHOUT EYES

Our incredible human minds can see without eyes. We have the power of vision whether our lids are open or shut, measured at 20/20 or legally blind.  With yoga practice, we can create a vivid vision nonexistent outside our minds but quite tangible to the mind that has created it. A mountain vista, passing clouds and geometric patterns sketched on the surface of our neural pathways can be part of a practice involving pratyahara. Pratyahara is one of the eight limbs that comprise a yogic approach to living.

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VISUALIZATION WITHOUT EYES


2. Niyama = our attitudes toward our environment, including:


3. Asana = the practice of body exercises


4. Pranayama = the practice of breathing exercises


5. Pratyahara = the restraint of our senses

6. Dharana = the ability to direct our mind


7. Dhyana = the ability to develop interactions with what we seek to understand


8. Samadhi = complete integration with the object to be understood


Pratyahara

Pratyahara is a Sanskrit word often understood as “restraint of our senses,” shared above. According to an article from Yoga International, this word comes from two parts, prati (against/away) and ahara (what we take in from the outside). Pratyahara then may translate as “control of ahara.” Just a few examples of things we take in (ahara) include food, misunderstanding and our sensory perceptions. By controlling what we eat, we may build physical strength or regulate blood sugar. By controlling misunderstanding, we may relieve anxiety and recognize falsehoods. By controlling our sensory perceptions, we enable the mind to turn inward.


Nidra

Yoga nidra is a powerful and frequently untapped tool for practicing yoga that may involve visualizations to explore the inner workings of the mind from a restorative state. To try yoga nidra, seek a yoga class with a qualified instructor who teaches nidra to guide your experience. This is what you can expect:



Sources and Resources :


LAUREN WEAVER, RYT 200

Lauren Weaver is a Yogi, Yoga Instructor, and Assistant Instructor with the Yoga Teacher Training Program at Lexington Healing Arts Academy. She can be reached via email at Lauren.mw32@ gmail.com.

more articles by Lauren Weaver

Our incredible human minds can see without eyes. We have the power of vision whether our lids are open or shut, measured at 20/20 or legally blind.


With yoga practice, we can create a vivid vision nonexistent outside our minds but quite tangible to the mind that has created it. A mountain vista, passing clouds and geometric patterns sketched on the surface of our neural pathways can be part of a practice involving pratyahara. Pratyahara is one of the eight limbs that comprise a yogic approach to living.


Limbs

Yoga is not a religion but rather an accepting approach compatible with religious beliefs. The eight limbs of yoga, as translated from yoga sutra 2.29 and presented in “The Heart of Yoga,” are not akin to levels that you work up to but are rather co-existing components:


1. Yama = our attitudes toward our environment, including: