HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

“For the girl who is get ting the (infertility) diagnosis now, it’s not hopeless,” said Kristin Posey Wallis, a uterine transplant nurse at Baylor University who works closely with women and their donors.


Currently, uterus transplants are expensive, costing up to $500,000. Like other infertility treatments, insurance companies rarely cover these procedures, which they classify as elective. Over time, doctors hope the costs will decrease and insurance companies will change their stance on coverage.

UTERUS TRANSPLANT BECOMES VIABLE OPTION

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover

transplanted uterus occurs between 34 to 36 weeks into the pregnancy.


The first successful uterus transplant from a living donor was performed in 2013 by Dr. Mats Brännström and his team at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. The recipient mother gave birth in 2014. Worldwide, 56 uterine transplant procedures have been performed, 53 of which involved women born without a uterus. These transplants resulted in 13 babies born. There have been 10 recorded cadaver uterus transplants in the United States, Turkey and the Czech Republic as of December 2018. Doctors at the Cleveland Clinic attempted a pregnancy from a uterus from a deceased donor in 2016, but it failed due to an infection.


A uterus transplant performed at the Hospital das Clinicas at the University of São Paulo School of Medicine in Brazil resulted in the birth of a healthy baby girl in December 2018. The uterus was without oxygen for eight hours before the transplant, proving cadaver uteri could remain functional after cold, oxygenless storage at least four times as long as the average time after live donations.

The uterus, or womb, houses and nourishes the fetus until birth. But one in five women are born without a uterus. Additionally, absolute uterine factor infertility – an abnormality of the womb that interferes with fetal development – affects 5 percent of women worldwide. Successful uterus transplants over the past five years have made this a viable option for these women as well as women who have had hysterectomies due to cancer or other problems.


At least a dozen children in Sweden, the United States and Serbia have been born to women with uteri transplanted from a living relative since 2013. In 2017, a baby was born from a uterus transplant from a non-relative donor in the United States. And last December, a baby was born from a uterus transplant from a deceased donor.


The surgery, which can take about 10 hours, involves connecting the recipient’s veins, arteries, ligaments and vaginal canal to the donated uterus. Afterward, several immunosuppression drugs are required to prevent the body’s natural instinct to fight off and reject a transplanted organ. Depending on the recipient’s medical condition, she may experience menses for the first time after a uterus transplant. Within a year, insemination occurs. Uterine transplants do not include Fallopian tubes, so eggs and sperm must be implanted within the uterus. Often immunosuppression drugs are continued through-out the pregnancy. A delivery via Caesarean section that includes the removal of the