HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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TRAVELING WITH YOUR PET

Line it with shredded paper or towels in case of accidents or motion sickness.


Bring your pet’s bowls, bed, blankets and toys with you so he has something familiar in a new place such as a hotel or other accommodations. You will also want to bring his regular food and medications. Use bottled water because drinking water from a place the pet isn’t used to could cause stomach issues.


Never leave your animal alone in a parked vehicle (even when you’re not on vacation). On a hot day, even with the windows open, a parked car can become a furnace very quickly, and heatstroke can develop. In cold weather, a car can act as a refrigerator, holding in the cold and causing the animal to freeze to death.

It looks like this summer we’ll finally be able to travel again! And of course you don’t want to leave your four-legged family members behind. Here are some tips for traveling with your pet:


Be sure you have a collar and a tag with contact information on the animal just in case your pet gets lost. Ideally, microchipping your pet will ease that worry. Carry photos of your pet with you – again, just in case you have to advertise she’s lost or identify her if she’s found.


Make an appointment with your pet’s veterinarian for a checkup before you leave to make sure your pet’s vaccinations are up to date. Get a health certificate from your veterinarian dated within 10 days of your departure. This is also a good time to ask your vet for recommendations for ways to keep your pet calm while traveling.


More people are flying with their pets these days. Check the airline’s rules and regulations for flying with animals. You will probably need to have a cage that can fit on board. In the airport, always keep the animal in control by using a leash.


You may want to buy a USDA-approved crate if you’re driving and want to make sure the animal doesn’t interfere or get too agitated. The crate should be large enough for your pet to stand, sit and turn around in comfortably.