HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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well maintained and age appropriate. They should be worn consistently and correctly and be appropriately certified for use. Players of all ages, but especially younger ones, should be educated about injuries and told to report any hits, bumps or dings immediately. They should also know the signs to look for over the hours and weeks after an incident.

SPORTS CONCUSSIONS CAN BE SERIOUS

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover

according to the BIRI. Young children and teens are more likely to sustain a concussion and can take longer to recover than adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) 2018 publication: Get a HEADS UP on Concussion in Sports Policies. Children and teens comprise about 70 percent of all sports and recreation-related concussions seen in emergency departments. Children have the highest rate of emergency department visits for TBI of all age groups, according to the CDC’s 2018 Report to Congress: The Management of Traumatic Brain Injury in Children.


Concussions occur more often in competitive high school sports. Football accounts for more than 60 percent of concussions for males. For females it is soccer. But baseball targets the head the most: Almost half of all baseball-related injuries involve a child’s head, face, mouth or eyes, says the BIRI. It takes longer for a high school athlete to recover from a sports concussion than it does a college athlete, according to the BIRI.


To help reduce the risk of a concussion or other serious brain injury, athletes should wear the correct protective equipment. Helmets should fit properly and be

A concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to either the head or the body that makes the brain move rapidly inside the skull. A concussion changes the way the brain normally functions. An estimated 1.6 to 3.8 million sports- and recreational-related concussions occur in the United States each year, according to the Brain Injury Research Institute (BIRI). A total of 1.6 million are documented, but 50 percent of concussions are unreported, according to the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine Position Statement in 2013, published in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine.


Signs and symptoms of concussion include headache, nausea, fatigue, confusion or memory problems, sleep disturbances and mood changes. These symptoms are typically noticed right after the injury occurs, but some may not be recognized until days or weeks later. Up to 86 percent of athletes who suffer a concussion will experience post-traumatic migraine or some other type of headache pain. Recent evidence indicates the presence and severity of headache symptoms may be a very significant indicator of the severity of the head injury and help guide the decision on when the athlete can return to play.


Concussions – even a seemingly mild ding or bump on the head – can have serious, long-term health effects. Lack of proper diagnosis and management of concussion may result in risk of coma or even death. Concussions and TBI cause 1.5 times more deaths than AIDS,