PAP SMEAR: TEST LOOKS FOR PRESENCE OF PRECANCEROUS CELLS

A Pap smear is a procedure that screens for cervical cancer. Most women should start getting Pap smears at age 21 years and every three years after. It should be a part of your annual physical exam. The test looks for the presence of precancerous or cancerous cells on the cervix, the opening of the uterus or womb. During the procedure, cells from the cervix are scraped away. It is not painful and takes less than 10 minutes to complete. You may bleed a little after the test is completed.

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WHAT IS A MEDICARE WELLNESS EXAM?

A Medicare Wellness Exam is a preventative screening visit your provider wants you to have once a year. This visit is free and is separate from your annual physical exam (if your plan covers annual physicals). Traditional Medicare does not pay for a physical – it only covers a Wellness Exam.  What is a Wellness Exam? The visit is covered once every 12 months (11 full months must have passed since your last visit). It is designed to help prevent disease and disability based on your current health....

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ORAL HERPES

Oral herpes is an infection caused by a specific type of the herpes simplex virus. This condition, also called HSV-1 or sometimes cold sores or fever blisters, creates painful sores on your lips, gums and tongue, as well as the roof of your mouth and sometimes the inside of your cheeks. It may even affect your nose and chin. Symptoms of oral herpes include swelling in the lymph nodes, fever, tiredness and aching muscles. While the initial infection with oral herpes occurs most often in children ages 1-2 years, ….

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SHOULDER INJURIES REQUIRE EARLY TREATMENT

use, especially after several months of nonuse. If the issues you are experiencing do not improve after a few days or the pain increases, you may want to seek medical attention from your primary care physician. At Family Practice Associates, we will get you in to our walk-in clinic and/or to your regular provider, who will then refer you to our physical therapist, Theresa Hobson. She will evaluate you and treat you based on the assessment findings and the acuteness and irritability of your injury. Most shoulder issues can be treated without pain medication through manual therapy, including IASTM, dry needling, assisted motion and resetting of the joint and capsule as well as modalities such as electrical stimulation and cryotherapy. You’ll also receive information about rest and activity modification. Often following an injury, simply exercising the proper way with proper movement is all one needs to improve function.


“Often I see patients shrugging their shoulder to help it move again, thus using other muscles to compensate and utilizing poor technique, which then becomes habit,” Hobson said. “This type of compensating can actually extend the healing process of the affected tissues due to poor mechanics.” It is important to get this corrected as soon as possible to preserve mobility of the joint and surrounding

structures, especially if pain symptoms persist with limited motion of the extremity involved. A simple shoulder injury can turn into a major issue if left untreated. Seek treatment as quickly as possible if your shoulder issue continues and especially if it worsens over time.

THERESA HOBSON


You shrug them; you give your children ceiling-scraping rides on them; you sling your purse or back pack on them. Shoulders are an amazing part of the anatomy. They consist of several bones, including the scapula or shoulder blades; the humerus (the upper arm bone); and the clavicle (collarbone). Because it is a ball-and-socket joint with a wide range of movement – it’s the most mobile joint in the body – the shoulder is susceptible to different types of overuse injuries, bursitis, rotator cuff problems and shoulder impingement. There are also fractures, dislocations and other more emergent shoulder problems. In cases of falls, trauma or shoulder pain associated with factors of a possible heart attack, get care immediately.


Now that spring is right around the corner and the days are getting longer with more time for recreational activities, many of you may experience shoulder pain. It may be an acute, sharp pain or a dull pain, depending on how you move your arm or sleep. Sometimes doing nothing at all may cause pain. It is important to realize some shoulder pain can come not only from the soft tissue structures themselves, but also from the cervical spine. This is known as referred pain. A strain to the neck can cause nerve irritation or soreness and pain in the shoulder structures.


Muscles and other soft tissue surrounding the shoulder blade and shoulder itself can be injured with repeated movements or intense