EYEGLASSES MAKE A FASHION STATEMENT

According to the Vision Council of America, approximately 75 percent of adults wear some sort of vision correction. People wear eyeglasses for different reasons. Some people are nearsighted and cannot see objects far away, while other people are farsighted and cannot see objects close by. Eyeglasses offer corrective vision for people who have difficulty seeing.

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LOCAL SPOTLIGHT - KENTUCKY HEALTH SOLUTIONS

It is that most wonderful time of the year—no, we are not talking about Christmas. It’s Medicare’s Annual Enrollment Season. Yes, it’s the time of the year when we stress and spend hours on the phone or online shopping for health coverage. The pain of having to shop health coverage, spend hours on the phone or online with one company vs another for our health insurance can be a daunting task. It does not matter if you are on Medicare or looking for your personal insurance, this can be one of the most….

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DO YOU HAVE 20/20 VISION

When you consider what defines healthy eyes, among the criteria is good vision. The American Optometric Association says the term 20/20 vision is used to express normal visual acuity (the clarity or sharpness of vision) measured at a distance of 20 feet. If you have 20/20 vision, you can see clearly at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity is usually measured with a Snellen chart. It’s likely everyone has seen the Snellen chart – usually starting with a huge “E,” .....

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Some believe free range is a healthy route to take. “Any animal that is fed antibiotics would be pulled out of this program,” Carter said. “Most of the time when you see these markets, they say they are antibiotic free and hormone free.”


At the end of the day, it tends to be about budget and how much you want to spend, as well as personal preference.


“It is more of a perception and personal choice as to whether you want to buy free-range products or a conventional product,” Hawkins said. “Just because a product is raised in a more traditional background as opposed to a free-range situation does not mean the care given to that animal is any different. The producers (on both ends of the spectrum) take pride in and care for their animals.”


“It just comes down to what somebody wants,” Carter said. “Traditionally in these types of programs, the cost will be higher. It needs to be because there are higher costs involved for the producer.”

For farmers, free-range livestock has become a hot topic of conversation.


“Kentucky has 37,000 beef producers and is the largest cattle state east of the Mississippi,” said Katelyn Hawkins, general member of the beef council of the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association. From a health standpoint, whether you choose free range or a conventional route of beef production, you are still getting the same nutritional benefits.


“No matter what type of beef you choose, as far as the production practice that goes behind it – whether it is grain finished, grass finished, natural, organic or even free range – when you eat it you are getting 25 grams of protein and 10 essential vitamins and nutrients off a 3-ounce portion,” Hawkins said. “Some people choose free range because they do not necessarily fully understand the production cycle and what happens on the farm. They like the idea that there is a free-range option.”


There are many reasons to consider free-range livestock. “The main benefits are that it is locally sourced and the dollars stay in Kentucky,” said Nick Carter, agriculture and natural resources agent for the Fayette County Farm Bureau. “In most cases you feel comfortable with how it is being handled.”

SHOULD YOU CHOOSE FREE RANGE LIVESTOCK?

JAMIE LOBER

Jamie Lober is a Staff Writer for Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by Jamie Lober

Beef is a versatile meat. There are so many options for using it that everyone is sure to find some- thing they like. “Those (cuts) that are determined lean by the dietary guidelines include America’s favor- ite cuts, like T-bone, tenderloin, sirloin and even flank steak,” said Hawkins.


You can always serve beef with something to make it even more appealing. “Everyone likes color on their plate, so try a stir-fry recipe or use beef as a salad topper,” said Hawkins.