NEW TECHNOLOGY INSTRUMENTAL IN RECOVERING FROM CONCUSSION

Professional sports teams, as well as high school and college teams, are increasing their awareness and protocols for assessing acquired brain injury, also known as concussions. Teams want to be sure their athletes are 100 percent ready to return to the field after suffering a concussion.  One crucial thing a concussion does is affect your ability to point your eyes, so a prime way to evaluate the severity of a hit is through eye tracking. Eye tracking measures the eyes’ ability to work together.

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VISION THERAPY AND ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY

The eye is amazing. Did you know more than 1.9 million fibers come from the eye into the brain? Each of those fibers creates its own pathway to the brain and has its own distinct function. So when someone has a stroke or other acquired brain injury (ABI), vision is often affected.  ABIs include concussions suffered in severe sports-related hits or a car accident, as well as cerebral or vascular strokes. An ABI can affect both neurological pathways in the eye, the focal or parvocellular pathway, which is....

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SYNTONICS: CREATING BALANCE FOR THE EYES

Syntonics, or optometric phototherapy, is a form of light therapy used to treat a variety of vision problems. It is available at Family Eyecare Associates to help patients with a variety of vision problems, such as strabismus (eye turns), amblyopia (lazy eye), focusing and convergence problems and learning disorders. It has also been shown to be very effective for people who suffer from migraines.

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SENSORY INTEGRATION IMPORTANT FOR BALANCE

What happened the last time you went on the Mad Tea Party ride at DisneyWorld? Did you enjoy yourself initially, but as the ride went on, did you start to feel sick and disoriented? When you closed your eyes, however, you probably felt much better. And you were immensely glad when the ride ended and you could get your bearings again.


Vision plays a significant role in balance.


There are basically three components to balance:


1. Vision, which includes much more than clear eyesight;

2. Vestibular system, which includes fluid filled canals of the inner ear; and

3. Somatosensory system, which includes both proprioception, or movement of the body, and tactile, or sense of touch.


These sensory components work together through a process called sensory integration.


Sensory integration is the way your vestibular and somatosensory systems communicate with and relate to your vision. The vestibular system is like a gyroscope that helps orient us spatially. Fluid in sacs in the inner ear moves around when you tip your head and it tells you where your head is in relationship to your physical environment.


The somatosensory cortex is an area of the brain that processes input from various systems in the body that are sensitive to touch. It lets you feel your feet touching the floor or your back resting against a chair. The different sensory systems are constantly talking to each other as you move through space, sending information to the brain about where you are and how fast you are moving; and comparing their individual findings.


The reason you get dizzy on the tea-cup ride, or have motion sickness, is the three systems are telling your brain different things. The fluid in the vestibular system whirls in one direction at a high velocity, so when you stand up, that system tells you you’re spinning. But your eyes say you are standing still. The systems don’t match up. Then the brain decides there is a neurotoxic substance in your system that must be expelled, thus causing nausea. With motion sickness, your eyes tell you you’re sitting still, not moving. But the vestibular system is getting jostled around and telling the brain you are moving. When all three systems are working in sync, motion sickness and balance problems are are reduced and often alleviated. That’s why in some instances, closing Closing your eyes can help you reestablish stability.


Over time, however, the relationship between the vestibular system and vision changes. Vision stays relatively stable but the vestibular system actually changes with age. The signal from the system hyperstimulates and it takes a while for the fluid in the inner ear to settle down. This is why you probably don’t enjoy roller coasters or spinning rides as much as you did when you were a youngster. Children love high-velocity spinning, but it’s too much for us as we get older.


Some Dr. Graebe’s office provides neuro-visual therapy programs that help with motion sickness problems. Their office also works closely with other specialists when needed.  Often it This is helpful when your balance issues call calls for the additional skills of an occupational therapist, who will work with the vestibular system; or a physical therapist, who will do more with midline awareness of the body; and a vision therapist, who might prescribe provides neuro-visual therapy or prisms to help you. The three specialists, working together, can determine which of the systems is most at fault and plan appropriate treatment.


For further information, or to schedule and appointment, you can reach Dr. Graebe’s office in Versailles at (859)- 879-3665.

DR. RICK GRAEBE

Dr. Graebe received both his B.S degree in Visual Science and Doctorate of Optometry from Indiana University. He is a Behavioral Optometrist and learning expert. He has been in private practice here in the Bluegrass area for the past 32 years.

more articles by dr rick graebe