HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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 can be accessed in clinical trials that evaluate their efficacy as they work towards the goal of getting FDA approval. Talk with your oncologist about the possibilities available to you.


In 2020, according to the American Cancer Society, almost 21,800 American women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer and almost 14,000 women will die from the disease. Factors associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer include a family history of ovarian cancer, abnormalities in BRCA genes, age, endometriosis, having never given birth and having had trouble getting pregnant.

SEARCHING FOR NEW CANCER DRUGS

The four most common types of ovarian cancers are serous carcinoma, clear cell carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma and endometrioid carcinoma. Ovarian cancer is also defined by stage, which depends on how far the disease may have spread from the ovaries. The five-year survival rate of stage 1 ovarian cancer is 90 percent. This means about nine out of 10 patients will still be alive five years after their diagnosis. There is still no cure for advanced ovarian cancer.


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved Zejula as a frontline maintenance treatment for patients who have had a complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. Other promising therapies have been undergoing clinical trials. These include vaccines; antibody-drug conjugates; targeted therapies; and protein and gene therapies.


It is possible to access different ovarian cancer treatments. Drugs approved by the FDA for the patient’s stage and treatment history can be prescribed by any oncologist “on label.” Drugs that are approved for another stage, treatment history or cancer type can be prescribed “off label” or possibly accessed through a clinical trial. Drugs that are investigational (not yet FDA-approved for any disease)

Across the world in numerous laboratories, research is ongoing in the quest to discover new drugs to fight cancer. The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) says one of those new drugs is fadraciclib. It may be used to treat a wide range of cancer types, including some blood cancers and solid tumors. It is currently being tested in early clinical trials.


A team of scientists from Cyclacel, a biotechnology firm based in Dundee, Scotland, and Short Hills, NJ, and the Cancer Research UK Cancer Therapeutics Unit at the ICR described the discovery of fadraciclib in the journal PLOS One. It was created by improving the chemical properties of a previous CDK inhibitor drug from Cyclacel called seliciclib. These structural design modifications led to 20 times more potent activity against the CDK2 and CDK9 targets and an equivalent 30 times increase in therapeutic potency against a panel of human cancer cells, according to the published research. Experiments in cells and mice demonstrated fadraciclib’s potential as a treatment for leukemia. It inhibited the growth of human acute myeloid leukemia tumors growing in immune-deprived mice by up to 100 percent.


Making Strides Against Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer is commonly diagnosed at more advanced stages because its early-stage symptoms are often mistaken for benign ail- ments, says Cancercommons.org. Symptoms of advanced-stage ovarian cancer include bloating, belly pain, frequent need to urinate and quickly feeling full after eating.