HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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Try not to restrain children of this age in strollers, high chairs or carriers for more than one hour at a time. WHO also recommends plenty of good-quality sleep (14 to 17 hours for babies up to 3 months old and 12 to 16 hours for those four to 11 months old). Sedentary screen time is not recommended.


Children and adolescents aged 5-17 years old:

Those in this group should do an average of 60 minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous intensity exercise, mostly aerobic physical activity. For this group, sedentary screen time should be limited.


Adults aged 18-64 years old:

If you fall into this category, try to do at least 150 to 300 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity or at least 75 to 150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity. You will also want to incorporate muscle-strengthening activities two or more days a week to get additional health benefits. And as with the other groups, limit your sedentary screen time.


Adults aged 65 years and older:

The recommendations for this group are the same as for the above group, although older adults should do multicomponent physical activities that emphasize balance and strength training.


Pregnant and postpartum women:

All pregnant and postpartum women without contraindication should do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week, incorporating a variety of aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities. Again, limit the amount of time spent being sedentary.


Use these guidelines as a challenge to see if you can do a little more than recommended as your fitness levels improve (and they will, if you keep it up). As always, before starting any exercise program, especially if you’ve been a couch potato, talk to your primary health care provider.


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PHYSICAL ACTIVITY FOR ALL

and cognitive decline and for improving memory and boosting brain health. Being physically active can actually add years to your life – and life to your years.


Especially now as we manage the constraints of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to keep moving. Physical activity takes many forms – not just the regular exercises such as walking, jogging, swimming or cycling, but also dancing, playing, gardening and cleaning. Physical activity of any type and any duration can improve health and well-being. If you spend a lot of time sitting, whether at work or school, you should do more physical activity to counter the harmful effects of sedentary behavior.


WHO OFFER THESE GUIDELINES FOR DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS AND SPECIFIC POPULATION GROUPS FOR HOW MUCH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IS NEEDED FOR GOOD HEALTH:


For children under 5 years old:

In a 24-hour day, infants (less than 1 year old) should be physically active several times a day in a variety of ways, particularly through interactive floor-based play.

Fitness is for everyone: young people, old people, middle-aged people, even pregnant women. The World Health Organization (WHO) says up to 5 million deaths a year could be averted if the global population was more active. The WHO recently released guidelines on physical activity that emphasize everyone, regardless of age and/or ability, can and should be physically active. WHO defines physical activity as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that requires energy expenditure. Every type of movement counts.


The new guidelines recommend at least 150 to 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity per week for all adults, including people living with chronic conditions or disability. Children and adolescents should aim for an average of 60 minutes per day. These demographic groups are particularly targeted because WHO statistics show one in four adults and four out of five adolescents do not get enough physical activity.


The guidelines encourage women to maintain regular physical activity throughout pregnancy and after delivery. Older adults (aged 65 years or older) are advised to add activities that emphasize balance and coordination as well as muscle strengthening to help prevent falls and improve health.


Regular physical activity is the key to preventing and helping manage heart disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes and some types of cancer. It is also beneficial for reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety