STAYING FIT AND HEALTHY DURING THE HOLIDAYS

With the holidays coming up, the highlight for many people during this season is gathering with family and friends and enjoying favorite holiday treats. Here are some tips that will help you enjoy your holidays to the fullest while not increasing your waistline.

….FULL ARTICLE

MAKING AND KEEPING NEW YEARS RESOLUTIONS

Only 8 percent of individuals achieved their resolutions in 2016, according to Statistic Brain. This is likely due to most people having unrealistic expectations about the speed, ease and consequences of the resolutions they make. People attempting self-change rarely succeed the first time; most need five or six attempts, according to a paper published in American Psychologist by Janet Polivy and Peter Herman. The authors suggest false hope syndrome is the cause for failure.

….FULL ARTICLE

HEALTHY HOLIDAY OPTIONS

The holidays are a wonderful time to gather with family and friends to celebrate. These celebrations often consist of many delicious treats and hardy meals. You can still maintain a healthy diet with a little thought and planning in advance. Research from a recent Web-based survey found 18 percent of people feel they cannot eat healthily during the holidays because they don’t want to miss out on their favorite foods. You can still eat the foods you enjoy this season, just in moderation.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

Sources and Resources:


•  American Cancer Society (2016). Learn About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer.

•  Oral Cancer Foundation (2017).

Oral cancer is often thought of as a disease that strikes older people or heavy smokers. But it is shocking for many people to learn nonsmoking young adults are the fastest growing segment of oral cancer patients. This is largely due to the rise in human Papillomavirus HPV-16 diagnoses among this group. According to the American Cancer Society, men face twice the risk of developing oral cancer as women, and men who are over age 50 face the greatest risk. It is estimated that over 40,000 people in the United States have received a diagnosis of oral cancer.


Cigarette, cigar or pipe smokers are six times more likely than non-smokers to develop oral cancers. Smokeless tobacco users, along with those who use dip, snuff or chewing tobacco products, are 50 times more likely to develop cancers of the cheek, gums and lining of the lips. All these are addictive disorders and as a result often draw the attention of mental health and addictive disorder specialists. Still, it is important to note that over 25 percent of all oral cancers occur in people who do not smoke and who only drink alcohol occasionally.


More than 600,000 cases of oral and oropharyngeal cancer are diagnosed each year worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. In the United States, more than 48,000 individuals will be diagnosed with this debilitating, disfiguring disease this year with 9,570 deaths, roughly one person an hour each day.

ORAL CANCER NEEDS YOUR IMMEDIATE ATTENTION

Cancer is defined as the uncontrollable growth of cells that invade and cause damage to surrounding tissue. Oral cancer appears as a growth or sore in the mouth that does not go away. It can be life threatening if not diagnosed and treated early. Oral cancer includes cancers of the lips, tongue, cheeks, floor of the mouth, hard and soft palate, sinuses and pharynx.


It is important to be aware of the most common symptoms of oral cancer. These include any swellings, lumps or rough spots on the lips, gums or other areas inside the mouth. There may be velvety white, red or speckled patches in the mouth. Other symptoms are unexplained numbness, loss of feeling or pain and tenderness in any area of the face, mouth, or neck. Also be aware of any indications of soreness; a feeling that something is caught in the back of the throat; ear pain; or difficulty chewing, swallowing, speaking or moving the jaw or tongue. Finally, if you notice unexplained hoarseness, have a chronic sore throat, a change in your voice or unexplained bleeding in the mouth, see your dentist immediately.

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller