HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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The addicted person may abandon responsibilities or have mood swings, depression, lowered motivation and anxiety attacks.


An overdose of opioids requires immediate medical attention. Call 911 if you suspect you or someone you know has had an overdose. Symptoms of opioid overdose include unresponsiveness, slow or erratic breathing or no breathing at all, a slow or erratic pulse or no pulse, vomiting, loss of consciousness and constricted pupils. In some states, a nasal spray, Narcan, is available to keep on hand in case of an overdose. Talk with your doctor about it.


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OPIOIDS AND OVERDOSE

JEAN JEFFERS

Jean is an RN with an MSN from University of Cincinnati. She is a staff writer for Living Well 60+ and Health & Wellness magazines. Her blog may be seen on her website at www.normajan.naiwe.com

more articles by jean jeffers

because you are not taking the opioid. Work with your doctor to prevent the occurrence of dependence and withdrawal symptoms.


Addiction is a disease that affects your brain and your behavior. It creates a desire to consume a drug on a regular basis. When you take a drug initially, particularly a controlled substance that has been known to cause addiction, you have control over your choice. When misused, the pleasure effect of the drug demands the person keep using it. Over a period of time, your brain changes and you develop a powerful urge to use the drug. Opioids create endorphins in the brain as brain structure is altered. Besides blocking pain, these endorphins make you feel good. When you use too much of an opioid, you may shut down the body’s center for making endorphins and the body then must rely on what you give it. The longer you use opioids, the more likely this is to happen.


Knowing you are addicted is the first step to recovery. One obvious sign of addiction is being unable to curtail use of the drug. Symptoms of substance abuse may be physical, behavioral or psychological. Some signs of opioid abuse include poor coordination, drowsiness, a shallow or slow breathing rate, nausea and vomiting, constipation, physical agitation and poor decision making

The overuse and misuse of opioids is a serious health problem. From 1999 to 2016, more than 630,000 people died from a drug overdose, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Around 66 of those deaths involved an opioid. In 2016, the number of overdose deaths involving opioids increased by five times the number of deaths in 1999.


Over the years, overdoses have come in waves. The third largest wave began in 2013 and has brought significant increases in overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids.


Opioids are a type of medicine sometimes used to relieve pain. They lower the number of pain signals your body sends to the brain. Doctors prescribe these drugs most often to relieve pain from dental procedures, injuries, surgeries and chronic illnesses such as cancer. Some of the opioid drugs available include opium, codeine, fentanyl, heroin, hydrocodone, methadone, morphine and oxycodone. A time for safe use is one month.


Opioids are a safe choice for pain management — if taken properly. But people who misuse these drugs may become addicted. Misusing opioids means you don’t follow the doctor’s directions, and it could mean you take the drugs illegally. Drug tolerance means getting used to a drug over time and then needing more of it to achieve the same effects. Drug dependence occurs when you have withdrawal symptoms