ASPECTS OF NORMAL AGING CAN BE IMPROVED WITH STRENGTH TRAINING

Why does a person work hard all their life saving up for retirement? Is it just to sit around and do as little as possible, maybe to be served and cared for by someone else? Maybe you fall on the opposite end of the spectrum; you want to be adventurous and independent, the cool grandparent the grandkids want to come visit. Unfortunately, the likelihood of that happening decreases as the body becomes more weak and frail.

….FULL ARTICLE

STOP FOCUSING ON HEALTH. START FOCUSING ON YOUR VALUES

“I want to get healthy.” That’s what you’re supposed to say, right? But is that what you really want? At the end of the day, do you really want to be remembered as “she was really healthy”?  Chances are, you want what health allows you to do. Maybe it is to be able to travel and be active out in nature or spend quality time with grandkids and family. To have mental clarity to innovate and be creative.  To feel confident. Experience life.

….FULL ARTICLE

ITS ALL ABOUT CHOICES

My cookbook, It’s All About Choices, was written about 17 years ago. It’s hard to believe that it has been that long and we now have adult children that practice the same values found in this book. While a lot of changes have happened in the last several years, the science behind leading a happier and healthier life has not.

….FULL ARTICLE

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NEVER DIET AGAIN!

– or worse than – when they started. The diet may be going well, until other extenuating life circumstances come up and everything falls apart. Over time, the diet becomes harder to maintain. Being told what to do becomes old and tiresome and the dieter decides they would rather enjoy life. So they fall back into the habits and lifestyle they were so tired of to begin with.


It doesn’t have to be that way.

Nutritional changes that become lifelong habits and bring about lasting change should be: 1) simple, 2) small and 3) consistent. Simple changes make sense to the person implementing the changes. They know why they’re doing it. These changes can be measured easily. Each change is a stepping stone that, along with other small changes, will lay the foundation for the healthy, long-term results the individual is seeking.


When incorporating a new habit into your life, think small. Then think smaller than that to establish the initial goal. You want to establish a pattern of success instead of a pattern of defeat. Many people try to attack the problem all at once, then crash and burn. This is common. The continual building of small habit changes after a year or several years won’t look like much in the midst of the

process, but will look like a complete life overhaul down the road.


In order to be consistent, you must be reminded of your goal. Post that goal somewhere to see it often and be reminded of why you’re doing this. It helps to have accountability, whether that’s through a trainer or friend. Use a calendar to mark off when the habit was completed and when it wasn’t. At the end of the month, you’ll be able to see how consistent you were. A visual representation of what actually happened might tell a different story from the picture in your head.


At the end of the day, we all want to look good, feel good and live well into old age. If that’s not how life looks right now, that’s okay. Lifelong habits won’t be formed in a week or in 30 days. They will be formed, however, by a continual commitment to small habits that contribute to long-term results.

There are no quick fixes, diets or magic pills that will get you to this place. Diets can bring about temporary change, but their long-term success rate is often low. Body Structure’s goal is to help our clients see the value in making small, sustainable changes that will build upon one another to get them the results they are seeking.


When many people think about improving their nutrition, what comes to mind is often a complicated task that is overwhelming and hard to stick to. Behavior change is difficult. Diets tend to complicate an already busy life with many rules regarding what you can or can’t eat. They may also require cooking skills or nutritional knowledge that take time to acquire. Piling on new skills, education and habits on top of current stresses is a recipe for disaster.


Diets are overwhelming.

In addition to learning a new set of rules and cooking skills, social circumstances often don’t line up with what the diet requires. They may also ask family and friends to make adjustments based on the dieter’s needs. A parent may have to expend twice the energy to make the family meal, along with their own diet-specific meal. Time and energy is finite and the amount required to sustain a restrictive diet for a long period will run out.


We know diets are hard to stick to and often result in the familiar rebound effect, where the dieter ends up in the same position as