NATURES BEAUTY - LILY

Easter is upon us, and no flower is more associated with the celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection than the lily. Traditional lore says white lilies emerged where drops of Christ’s sweat fell to the earth in his final hours on the cross. The ancient Greeks believed lilies came from the breast milk of Hera, the queen of the gods. In Roman mythology, Venus, the goddess of beauty, was jealous of the flower’s white loveliness. A European legend says if you approach an expectant mother holding a lily….

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NATURES BEAUTY - SQUASH

Is squash a vegetable or a fruit? You would probably call a zucchini squash a vegetable, but you would most likely call a pumpkin a fruit. The definitive answer, from a botanical view, is squash are fruits because they contain the seeds of the plant.  Squash are some of the oldest cultivated crops on earth, believed to have originated in Mexico and Central America more than 10,000 years ago. The word squash comes from the Narragansett Native American word askutasquash, which means…..

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NATURES BEAUTY - CINNAMON

One of the best-loved spices of cooks and food lovers alike is cinnamon. Made from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum tree, cinnamon has been around since the days of ancient Egypt, where it was used to embalm mummies. The tree is native to the Caribbean, South America and Southeast Asia. Indonesia and China produce three-quarters of the world’s supply of cinnamon today.

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NATURES BEAUTY - YUZU FRUIT

taking either of these, be sure to talk to your primary care physician before eating yuzu. If you have a citrus allergy, you should avoid eating yuzu.


Another intriguing claim is that yuzu has certain compounds that have been shown to potentially prevent cognitive decline and optimize brain health. In rats, yuzu extract was found to prevent cognitive dysfunction by reducing the buildup of beta amyloid proteins in the brain, which are believed to contribute to the development of cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Yuzu is good for your exterior, too – boosting skin health and preventing acne and other skin inflammations, such as psoriasis and eczema. Athletes say yuzu helps them with muscle recovery, and it is also an important source of anti-aging flavonoids.


A Japanese tradition is to bathe in yuzu during the winter solstice. The fruit is added to a tub of hot water, either enclosed in a cloth bag or cut in half. The ritual, called yuzuyu, is supposed to guard against colds, smooth rough skin and relax both the body and the mind. It’s also supposed to bring good luck. What a wonderful way to segue into a new season – seasoned by an amaz- ing and invigorating fruit.


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TANYA TYLER

Tanya Tyler is the Editor of Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by Tanya Tyler

Have you tried yuzu yet? This fruit that originated in Central China and Tibet is rapidly gaining popularity in the United States. It is also cultivated and used in Korea and Japan. Yuzu is mainly used as lemons are – juiced or just the zest (it’s a trifle too acidic to eat whole). In fact, yuzu is related to lemons, as well as oranges, grapefruit and limes. You’ll probably find yuzu juice rather than the fruit itself in this country; it is rarely imported and only a handful of growers are currently producing yuzu here. Yuzu peel is available in powder form to sprinkle on both desserts and savory dishes. The fruit is also used in a sauce called ponzu and to make liquor and wine. The oil from the skin of yuzu fruit is used in fragrances, soaps and lotions. Yuzu aromatics have been shown to decrease anxiety, depression and anger. The fragrance has been known to boost mood and reduce stress.


Yuzu looks like a small grapefruit. It grows on a thorny shrub and often takes more than 10 years to grow from seed. It contains numerous beneficial elements that help reduce inflammation. It has three times as much vitamin C as lemons and is rich in antioxidants, which keep the immune system strong. Because it has a powerful lineup of antioxidants, including limonene, yuzu can neutralize free radicals and thus may be able to reduce inflammation and, subsequently, disease. Yuzu promotes healthy blood flow. Recent research has shown it could stop blood clots from forming because it acts as an anticoagulant. This is probably because of hesperidin and naringin, two powerful components found in yuzu. The fruit may interact with common blood thinners such as Warfarin and Coumadin, causing averse side effects, so if you are