NATURES BEAUTY - LILY

Easter is upon us, and no flower is more associated with the celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection than the lily. Traditional lore says white lilies emerged where drops of Christ’s sweat fell to the earth in his final hours on the cross. The ancient Greeks believed lilies came from the breast milk of Hera, the queen of the gods. In Roman mythology, Venus, the goddess of beauty, was jealous of the flower’s white loveliness. A European legend says if you approach an expectant mother holding a lily….

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NATURES BEAUTY - SQUASH

Is squash a vegetable or a fruit? You would probably call a zucchini squash a vegetable, but you would most likely call a pumpkin a fruit. The definitive answer, from a botanical view, is squash are fruits because they contain the seeds of the plant.  Squash are some of the oldest cultivated crops on earth, believed to have originated in Mexico and Central America more than 10,000 years ago. The word squash comes from the Narragansett Native American word askutasquash, which means…..

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NATURES BEAUTY - CINNAMON

One of the best-loved spices of cooks and food lovers alike is cinnamon. Made from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum tree, cinnamon has been around since the days of ancient Egypt, where it was used to embalm mummies. The tree is native to the Caribbean, South America and Southeast Asia. Indonesia and China produce three-quarters of the world’s supply of cinnamon today.

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NATURES BEAUTY - SOURSOP

Soursop juice is used topically, as are its inedible seeds in pulverized form. These can be formulated into a skin astringent that can reduce lines and wrinkles and improve the appearance of age spots and blemishes. If you have joint pain or inflammation, rub a decoction of soursop on the affected area to get some relief. The anti-inflammatory compounds in soursop not only ease pain but also improve flexibility. These same anti-inflammatory properties help when you experience respiratory distress such as a cough or cold by clearing out your airways, relieving congestion and soothing irritation.


A controversial claim about soursop is that it is a cure or at least a viable alternative treatment for cancer. Proponents say its antioxidant activity has been directly linked to cancer prevention and a reduction in the size of tumors in animal studies. Acetogenins present in the fruit appear to cut off blood flow to foreign or abnormal cellular growths and protect healthy cells. However, reputable cancer authorities such as the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cancer Research UK say cancer treatment using soursop is not supported by reliable clinical evidence. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission says the studies touting soursop to treat cancer are bogus and there is no credible

scientific evidence that extract of soursop can prevent, cure or treat cancer of any kind. Please do not try using soursop in this way. Further study on human subjects is needed. Talk to your doctor before taking any kind of complementary or alternative therapy. But there’s no reason not to try soursop as a tasty treat in and of itself while awaiting new results.


Sources:


TANYA TYLER





Tanya Tyler is the Editor of Health & Wellness Magazine

You probably won’t find soursop growing in your average American back yard. Also known as graviola and Brazilian paw paw, soursop is the fruit of a small evergreen tree native to the tropical and subtropical regions of Central America and the Caribbean.


Soursop is related to the custard apple. What does the prickly dark-green, oval-shaped fruit taste like? Its texture is similar to that of a banana; its flavor has been described as a combination of strawberries and apples with sour citrus notes. It’s called soursop because of those acidic tangs. The pulp is used to make nectar, smoothies, juice drinks, candy and ice cream. The main supplier of soursop is Mexico, followed by Peru, Brazil, Ecuador, Guatemala and Haiti. The fruit, which can weigh up to 5 pounds, is generally taken from the tree when it is mature and is left to ripen in a dark corner. When the fruit is fully ripe, it is ready to eat.


Soursop has many health benefits, according to Organic Facts. These include its ability to kill parasites, improve respiratory conditions, boost the immune system, soothe the stomach, relieve pain and impart sedative qualities, which also makes soursop an effective treatment for insomnia. Soursop contains vitamins C and B and several antioxidant compounds. Soursop’s high potassium levels help lower blood pressure. Soursop also contains a small amount of niacin, riboflavin, folate and iron.