NATURES BEAUTY - LILY

Easter is upon us, and no flower is more associated with the celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection than the lily. Traditional lore says white lilies emerged where drops of Christ’s sweat fell to the earth in his final hours on the cross. The ancient Greeks believed lilies came from the breast milk of Hera, the queen of the gods. In Roman mythology, Venus, the goddess of beauty, was jealous of the flower’s white loveliness. A European legend says if you approach an expectant mother holding a lily….

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NATURES BEAUTY - SQUASH

Is squash a vegetable or a fruit? You would probably call a zucchini squash a vegetable, but you would most likely call a pumpkin a fruit. The definitive answer, from a botanical view, is squash are fruits because they contain the seeds of the plant.  Squash are some of the oldest cultivated crops on earth, believed to have originated in Mexico and Central America more than 10,000 years ago. The word squash comes from the Narragansett Native American word askutasquash, which means…..

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NATURES BEAUTY - CINNAMON

One of the best-loved spices of cooks and food lovers alike is cinnamon. Made from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum tree, cinnamon has been around since the days of ancient Egypt, where it was used to embalm mummies. The tree is native to the Caribbean, South America and Southeast Asia. Indonesia and China produce three-quarters of the world’s supply of cinnamon today.

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NATURES BEAUTY - LEMONGRASS

including the liver and kidney. Lemongrass limits cholesterol absorption so it promotes overall heart health. As a metabolism booster, lemongrass tea may enhance your weight-loss plans by helping your body digest food quicker, thus spurring the burning off of calories. If you have a cold or the flu, lemongrass tea will give you a good dose of vitamin C to strengthen your immune system. Do you have a fever, too? Lemongrass is known as the fever grass because it has been shown to reduce fever. Women who suffer from menstrual pain may also find lemongrass tea offers some welcome relief. People suffering from rheumatism may find lemongrass helps reduce their pain. Research conducted to prove the anti-cancer abilities of lemongrass has shown promising outcomes in the prevention of skin cancer.


To make lemongrass tea, chop the leaves up, put them in water and bring it to a boil. Let the tea steep for 10 to 15 minutes. One precaution is for people with diabetes: Lemongrass tea may lower blood sugar levels, so be sure to consult your primary care physician about drinking it. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid lemongrass due to the workings of certain chemical compounds.

Lemongrass isn’t just good for your insides. As a diluted skin tonic, it can help clear skin, strengthen skin tissue and treat such afflictions as acne and eczema. Steep your entire body in a lemongrass essential oil bath to calm your nerves and revive both mind and soul.


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TANYA TYLER

Tanya Tyler is the Editor of Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by Tanya Tyler

Wanting to latch onto the growing popularity of Asian cuisine, many cooks, both professional and amateur, are scouring their local produce aisles for exotic ingredients that give their dishes authenticity. Lemongrass – stems and leaves – is often used to impart a wonderful flavor not only to entrees such as curries and stir-fries but to teas and soups as well.


Lemongrass is native to India and tropical regions of Asia. The herb’s grass-like leaves have a distinct lemon flavor, although it is milder and sweeter than a lemon. To use lemongrass, remove the leafy top and woody bottom, strip off the tough outer layers and mince or chop the white inner stalk. The longer you cook it, the stronger the flavor becomes. You can grow your own lemongrass in a container or herb or flower garden; just make sure it has rich soil, plenty of water and full sun.


Lemongrass is used medicinally in many cultures. In Chinese medicine it is used as a remedy for stomach complaints such as constipation or indigestion. The main component of lemongrass is lemonal or citral, which provides the lemony smell in addition to anti-fungal and anti-microbial qualities. Tea made from the plant offers some great health benefits, such as soothing the stomach, aiding with digestion and regulating high blood pressure due to its high levels of potassium. Lemongrass has been reported to help people who have insomnia. Because it is full of antioxidants, lemongrass tea can serve as a detox agent. Detoxification helps regulate various organs of the body,