NATURES BEAUTY - LILY

Easter is upon us, and no flower is more associated with the celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection than the lily. Traditional lore says white lilies emerged where drops of Christ’s sweat fell to the earth in his final hours on the cross. The ancient Greeks believed lilies came from the breast milk of Hera, the queen of the gods. In Roman mythology, Venus, the goddess of beauty, was jealous of the flower’s white loveliness. A European legend says if you approach an expectant mother holding a lily….

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NATURES BEAUTY - SQUASH

Is squash a vegetable or a fruit? You would probably call a zucchini squash a vegetable, but you would most likely call a pumpkin a fruit. The definitive answer, from a botanical view, is squash are fruits because they contain the seeds of the plant.  Squash are some of the oldest cultivated crops on earth, believed to have originated in Mexico and Central America more than 10,000 years ago. The word squash comes from the Narragansett Native American word askutasquash, which means…..

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NATURES BEAUTY - CINNAMON

One of the best-loved spices of cooks and food lovers alike is cinnamon. Made from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum tree, cinnamon has been around since the days of ancient Egypt, where it was used to embalm mummies. The tree is native to the Caribbean, South America and Southeast Asia. Indonesia and China produce three-quarters of the world’s supply of cinnamon today.

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NATURES BEAUTY - LAVENDER

Lavender is one of the most delightful plants around. It is valued for its distinctive fragrance, medicinal properties and beautiful bluish-purple color. The herb Lavandula angus- tifolia thrives in most soil qualities, from poor to moderately fertile. Its main requirements are plenty of sun and good drainage. For best results, since it isn’t easy to grow lavender from seed, buy a starter plant from a nursery or take a cutting from a mature plant.


Lavender has been used over the centuries to help people who suffer from insomnia. Lavender has also been used to treat anxiety, depression and fatigue. Make a sachet filled with dried lavender and place it in your pil- lowcase to let the sweet scent help you achieve a good night’s sleep. According to a study conducted at Wesleyan University, smelling lavender before sleep increased study subjects’ percentage of deep or slow-wave sleep, and all reported higher vigor the morning after the lav- ender exposure. Add another lavender sachet to your towels, sheets, or cloths to repel moths.


The earliest recorded use of lavender dates back to ancient Egypt; lavender oil was used in the mummification process. The Latin root of lavender is lavare, which means to wash. People in Persia, ancient Greece and Rome often added lavender to their baths in the belief it helped purify body and mind. Lavender can be added into a daily facial cleansing routine to revive and uplift your skin as well as your spirits.

Lavender is often used as an ingredient in soaps, cosmetics, perfumes and potpourri. It is most commonly used in aromatherapy; its scent is purported to promote calmness and wellness and even treat headaches. Topical use of lavender oil may help treat a disease called alopecia aerate, which makes a person’s hair fall out in patches. Some people who rubbed the essential oils of lavender, thyme, rosemary and cedarwood on the areas where hair had fallen out experienced hair regrowth over the course of several months.


Lavender, like most herbs, is edible. It has received the U.S. Food and Drug Administration designa- tion of GRAS (generally recognized as safe for human consumption). However, make sure you are using culinary lavender in your recipes. Lavender leaves can be chopped and added to sauces or even cookies. The herb is frequently used as a spice or condiment in pastas, salads and dressings. Its buds can amplify both sweet and savory flavors in dishes. A classic lavender dried herb blend is herbes de Provence, which is a combination of lavender, thyme, savory, oregano, rosemary and marjoram. It can be used with meat, vegetables or other savory dishes. Lavender sugar is created when buds are put into sugar for two weeks to allow the essential oils and fragrance to transfer; then the sugar itself is used in baking. Lavender tea flavored with

lavender honey is one of my personal favorite remedies for recovering from a stressful day. Some people avoid ingesting lavender because they think it tastes like soap. The remedy for that? Lavender soap!


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TANYA TYLER





Tanya Tyler is the Editor of Health & Wellness Magazine