NATURES BEAUTY - LILY

Easter is upon us, and no flower is more associated with the celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection than the lily. Traditional lore says white lilies emerged where drops of Christ’s sweat fell to the earth in his final hours on the cross. The ancient Greeks believed lilies came from the breast milk of Hera, the queen of the gods. In Roman mythology, Venus, the goddess of beauty, was jealous of the flower’s white loveliness. A European legend says if you approach an expectant mother holding a lily….

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NATURES BEAUTY - SQUASH

Is squash a vegetable or a fruit? You would probably call a zucchini squash a vegetable, but you would most likely call a pumpkin a fruit. The definitive answer, from a botanical view, is squash are fruits because they contain the seeds of the plant.  Squash are some of the oldest cultivated crops on earth, believed to have originated in Mexico and Central America more than 10,000 years ago. The word squash comes from the Narragansett Native American word askutasquash, which means…..

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NATURES BEAUTY - CINNAMON

One of the best-loved spices of cooks and food lovers alike is cinnamon. Made from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum tree, cinnamon has been around since the days of ancient Egypt, where it was used to embalm mummies. The tree is native to the Caribbean, South America and Southeast Asia. Indonesia and China produce three-quarters of the world’s supply of cinnamon today.

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NATURES BEAUTY - HYACINTH

soul and nothing else. You should wear protective gloves when working with hyacinth bulbs. They do best when planted in the autumn, before the first frost, in well-drained soil, either in sun or partial shade. They usually flower from March through April. Set the bulb in the hole you dig with its pointed end up.


The depth of the hole, from about 2 to 8 inches, depends on which kind of hyacinth you are planting. Give the plants ample room to spread out by spacing them about 5 to 6 inches apart. Don’t water them too often – hyacinths don’t like a lot of water; it can cause rot. You can start or force them indoors and then transplant them to your garden. After their foliage dies back outdoors, you can bring the bulbs indoors again and store them in a cool, dark, dry place until the fall or winter. Popular varieties include Hyacinthus orientalis (the common Dutch hyacinth) and grape hyacinths, which have small cobalt-blue flowers.


The naturally sticky juice of the hyacinth plant was once used a book-binding glue. In flower language, the hyacinth symbolizes a fresh start. If you have acted carelessly or thoughtlessly (you know, if you need to bring flowers to your wife), hyacinths are one way to say you’re sorry. A blue hyacinth would indicate your sincerity, and a purple hyacinth be a sign of your sorrow for doing something wrong.


TANYA TYLER

Tanya Tyler is the Editor of Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by Tanya Tyler

“If thou of fortune be bereft, And in thy store there be but leftTwo loaves, sell one and with the dole,Buy hyacinths to feed thy soul.”    – John Greenleaf Whittier


There aren’t many things that can cheer your heart and bring beauty to an otherwise dreary day than flowers. Everyone, it seems, has a favorite flower; perhaps the hyacinth was poet Whittier’s. Not a bad choice.


Hyacinths are native to the eastern Mediterranean area of Anatolia (Turkey). The common garden hyacinth was brought to Europe in the 16th century. Hyacinths have been cultivated commercially ever since and are now mainly produced in Holland. They grow from perennial bulbs, just like lilies and irises. They received their name from a Greek myth, which says the flowers sprang up out of the blood of a youth named Hyacinth after the god Apollo accidentally killed him with a discus. Some versions of the myth say Zephyr, the god of the west wind, was jealous of Hyacinth’s attachment to Apollo, so he blew the thrown discus back and it struck Hyacinth in the head. On the flower’s petals Apollo inscribed the word “alas,” a sign of his sorrow.


Hyacinths belong to the lily family. They come in a rainbow of colors, including red, blue, white, orange, pink, purple and yellow. Each flower color has a unique fragrance. But as beautiful as hyacinths are, the bulbs are poisonous. They contain a substance called oxalic acid, which can remove rust, and handling them can cause mild skin irritation. This is probably why Whittier recommended you let hyacinths feed your