NATURES BEAUTY - LILY

Easter is upon us, and no flower is more associated with the celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection than the lily. Traditional lore says white lilies emerged where drops of Christ’s sweat fell to the earth in his final hours on the cross. The ancient Greeks believed lilies came from the breast milk of Hera, the queen of the gods. In Roman mythology, Venus, the goddess of beauty, was jealous of the flower’s white loveliness. A European legend says if you approach an expectant mother holding a lily….

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NATURES BEAUTY - SQUASH

Is squash a vegetable or a fruit? You would probably call a zucchini squash a vegetable, but you would most likely call a pumpkin a fruit. The definitive answer, from a botanical view, is squash are fruits because they contain the seeds of the plant.  Squash are some of the oldest cultivated crops on earth, believed to have originated in Mexico and Central America more than 10,000 years ago. The word squash comes from the Narragansett Native American word askutasquash, which means…..

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NATURES BEAUTY - CINNAMON

One of the best-loved spices of cooks and food lovers alike is cinnamon. Made from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum tree, cinnamon has been around since the days of ancient Egypt, where it was used to embalm mummies. The tree is native to the Caribbean, South America and Southeast Asia. Indonesia and China produce three-quarters of the world’s supply of cinnamon today.

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NATURES BEAUTY - ELDERBERRY

might help reduce inflammation. It may also have positive effects on cardiovascular health by reducing levels of uric acid in the blood. Elevated uric acid is linked to increased blood pressure and negative effects on heart health. Elderberry has been shown to increase insulin secretion and improve blood sugar levels.


Low-calorie elderberries are high in nutrients such as vitamin C. They are full of fiber and a good source of phenolic acids, compounds that are powerful antioxidants that reduce damage caused by oxidative stress in the body. Anthocyanins, which give the fruit its color, are some of the other antioxidants found in elderberries. These impart the fruit’s anti-inflammatory properties. Elderberry may even offer some antidepressant properties. However, extracting, heating or juicing the berries can reduce their antioxidant impact. You can find elderberry in numerous forms these days, such as liquids, capsules and gummies. Elderberry juice may reduce the level of fat in the blood and decrease cholesterol. One study using human subjects showed no significant reduction in cholesterol, but a study with mice with high cholesterol found a diet including black elderberry reduced the amount of cholesterol in the liver and aorta but not the blood. Further studies are needed, so whether to use elder- berry or not is entirely up to you, but be sure to consult with your primary care physician before incorporating it into your diet.





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TANYA TYLER





Tanya Tyler is the Editor of Health & Wellness Magazine

Elderberry is the dark purple or red berry from the European elder tree. It is used for making jelly or wine, but it also has some medicinal properties that have come down through the generations. It is one of the most commonly used medicinal plants in the world, with evidence showing Native Americas used it to treat infections and Egyptians used it to heal burns, according to Healthline.com. People have used it to combat cold and flu, as well as for constipation. With the flu, elderberry juice syrup seems to relieve symptoms and reduce the length of time the illness lasts, according to WebMd. Dried elderberries are used to treat sciatica, headaches and dental and nerve pain. Elderberry inhibits the growth of bacteria such as Helicobacter pylori. A skin product containing elderberry extract was found to have a sun protection factor of 9.88. If you’re a teen with acne, try an elderberry face wash. While some of these medicinal claims have been called into question and even disproved, others do appear to possess their stated benefits.


The European elderberry or black elder grows up to 30 feet and has clusters of small white-or cream-colored flowers known as elderflowers, which are edible. They are sometimes boiled with sugar to make a syrup, infused into tea or eaten in salad. The tart berries must be cooked before eating. Raw elderberries and the bark and leaves of the plant are poisonous. The leaves have been used for pain relief and to reduce swelling, while the bark has historically been used both as a diuretic and laxative. Apparently elderberry can affect the immune system and