NATURES BEAUTY - LILY

Easter is upon us, and no flower is more associated with the celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection than the lily. Traditional lore says white lilies emerged where drops of Christ’s sweat fell to the earth in his final hours on the cross. The ancient Greeks believed lilies came from the breast milk of Hera, the queen of the gods. In Roman mythology, Venus, the goddess of beauty, was jealous of the flower’s white loveliness. A European legend says if you approach an expectant mother holding a lily….

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NATURES BEAUTY - SQUASH

Is squash a vegetable or a fruit? You would probably call a zucchini squash a vegetable, but you would most likely call a pumpkin a fruit. The definitive answer, from a botanical view, is squash are fruits because they contain the seeds of the plant.  Squash are some of the oldest cultivated crops on earth, believed to have originated in Mexico and Central America more than 10,000 years ago. The word squash comes from the Narragansett Native American word askutasquash, which means…..

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NATURES BEAUTY - CINNAMON

One of the best-loved spices of cooks and food lovers alike is cinnamon. Made from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum tree, cinnamon has been around since the days of ancient Egypt, where it was used to embalm mummies. The tree is native to the Caribbean, South America and Southeast Asia. Indonesia and China produce three-quarters of the world’s supply of cinnamon today.

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NATURES BEAUTY - DURIAN

OK, so it’s not really beautiful, what with all its spikes (its name means “thorny fruit”) and its inside pulp with its wrinkled appearance. And it smells awful, making you question the wisdom of opening it. It’s durian, an exotic fruit from Malaysia that is slowly making inroads to the United States.


In Southeast Asia, durian is called the “king of fruits” because of its size. It can grow up to 12 inches long and 6 inches wide and often weighs as much as seven pounds. Ripe durians falling from trees have been known to kill people. In addition to its spikes, its smell is the fruit’s defining characteristic. It has been described as similar to raw sewage or worse. There are actual signs on some public transportation vehicles in Singapore forbidding anyone from opening a durian on board, and even some hospitals and hotels ban it. Its flesh has been described as custardy, creamy and sweet. The seeds are also edible.


The durian fruit can be consumed at various stages of ripeness and is used as flavoring agent in a wide variety of culinary and sweet preparations in Southeast Asian cuisines. Its relatives include okra, cocoa beans, hibiscus and cotton. Like other tropical fruits such as banana, avocado and jackfruit, durian is high in energy, minerals and vitamins. Though it contains relatively higher amounts of fats among fruits, it does not have any saturated fats or cholesterol.

It is rich in dietary fiber, which helps protect the colon’s mucous membrane by decreasing its exposure time to toxins. It also binds and eliminates cancer-causing chemicals from the gut. Durian is a good source of the antioxidant vitamin C. In a rare turn for a fruit, durian is an excellent source of the health-promoting B-complex groups of vitamins, such as niacin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine and thiamin. It also contains a beneficial amount of minerals such as manganese, copper, iron and magnesium. Durian is rich in potassium, an essential electrolyte that aids in controlling heart rate and blood pressure. Additionally, it also contains high levels of tryptophan, which has been called nature’s sleeping pill (it’s also found in turkey). Durian Haven (www.durian.net) cautions against eating durian with alcoholic beverages “as the combination of natural substances is a powerful producer of internal gas.”


According to Durian Haven, the Mon Thong variety of durian is the only variety that is suitable to be shipped to faraway destinations because it can be harvested weeks before the fruit has fully ripened, can be stored for weeks and has no tendency to rot prematurely.

Vietnam, Brunei, Indonesia and the Philippines also produce large quantities of durians.


The World Durian Festival has been celebrated in May in Thailand’s Chanthaburi province, which produces half of the country’s entire durian crop, thus earning it the title of “Durian Capital of the world.” According to www.tourismthailand.org, visitors can enjoy a decorated fruit contest, a parade, the Miss Fruit Gardener contest and participate in a durian fruit-eating competition at the festival. Road trip, anyone?

TANYA TYLER

Tanya Tyler is the Editor of Health & Wellness Magazine

more articles by Tanya Tyler