HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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could be one you choose to take. If worry and fear hinder your daily functioning, take the anxiety test.


It is unfortunate there is a stigma surrounding mental health issues in today’s society, which makes people feel less inclined to reach out for help. This can certainly change as more people become involved in the critical discussions and seek solutions. Try to feel comfortable broaching the subject of mental health with those you care about to help make this change happen.


The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) found early identification of a mental health problem leads to faster treatment and better outcomes. Mental illnesses such as depression put you at risk for health problems, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Studies also have found the reverse to be true, that chronic health conditions can increase the risk of mental illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention emphasizes someone’s mental health can change over time for many different reasons, including demands exceeding one’s resources and coping abilities. This demonstrates the importance of taking the time to complete a mental health screening – it can save lives.

MENTAL HEALTH SCREENINGS: THE FIRST STEP TO FEELING BETTER

JAMIE LOBER




Jamie Lober is a Staff Writer for Health & Wellness Magazine


Mental Health America of Kentucky (MHAK) believes everyone should get a mental health screening. Mental health issues do not discriminate. MHAK believes screenings for mental health should be as common as hearing or vision screenings because a person cannot achieve total wellness without good mental health. It is normal to experience feelings of sadness, stress or anxiety at different points in your life, but you should consider seeking help if these feelings interfere with daily living or become overwhelming.


The first step to feeling better is identifying the problem. If you Google mental health screenings you will find there are many you can do for free online in the privacy and comfort of your own home. You can also see a doctor or counselor to perform a similar test. A screening to rule out depression may ask questions such as whether you feel depressed or helpless; have trouble concentrating; feel bad about yourself; or are sleeping too little or too much. The screening to rule out anxiety may ask questions about whether you get headaches in public places; have a hard time breathing when you get nervous; worry whether people like you; or if you do not like to be with people you do not know well.


A great resource can be found on Mental Health America’s Web site at www.mhanational.org. The Web site explains which test is appropriate for each person. If you have extreme mood shifts, the bipolar test may be for you. If you are bothered by a traumatic life event, the PTSD