HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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experiencing problems with it. Substance-induced disorders, including intoxication, withdrawal and other substance/ medication-induced mental disorders (such as psychosis), are detailed alongside substance-use disorders. The DSM-5 says at least two of 11 criteria must be present in a 12-month period to classify a particular substance-use disorder:



Early intervention leads to more successful outcomes. Common signs of habitual use apply to all substances. These can include disinterest in activities; poor performance (school grades or at work); being chronically late; appearing tired and disinterested; changes in physical appearance; decline in hygiene; a noticeable lack of energy when performing daily activities; spending more money than usual and/or asking to borrow money; changes in appetite; weight loss; dark circles under the eyes; and flu-like symptoms. Some people get defensive when asked about substance abuse.


If you or someone you know is struggling with substance abuse, call the 24/7 Free Addiction Helpline at 1-888-459-5511 or the National Drug Helpline (also 24/7) at 844-289-0879.  You can also visit these two websites:


•  Treatment and Recovery Resources  (https://odcp.ky.gov/Pages/Treatment-Resources.aspx)

•  Free Rehab Centers  (www.FreeRehabCenters.org/city/ky-lexington) or call 1-800-774-5796

KNOWING THE SIGNS OF DRUG ABUSE

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover

behaviors and interpersonal relationships and a dysfunctional emotional response. Without treatment, addiction is progressive and can result in disability or premature death.


Treatment guidelines are often determined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), the classification tool published by the American Psychiatric Association. Significant changes were made to the DSM recently. Substance abuse and substance dependence were combined into single substance-use disorders specific to each substance within a new Addictions and Related Disorders category. The substance dependencies now include alcohol, opioids, sedatives and hypnotic or anxiolytic drugs (which includes benzodiazepines and barbiturates); cannabis; amphetamines and amphetamine-like drugs; hallucinogens; inhalants; phencyclidine and phencyclidine-like drugs; and nicotine.


There are two groups of substance-related disorders: substance-use disorders and substance-induced disorders. Substance-use disorders are patterns of symptoms result-ing from a substance that someone continues to take despite

Drug abuse – whether illicit or prescription medications – is so ubiquitous almost everyone has known someone in its throes: a family member, friend, coworker or classmate, or even themselves. In 2017, 134,704 Americans age 12 years or older used illicit drugs, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This is 49.5 percent of all respondents to the national survey.


Each year there is a slight increase in drug usage. Substance abuse and addiction often begin with experimenting in social settings or misusing prescription drugs, says the American Addiction Centers (AAC) (www.americanaddictioncenters.com). Left unchecked, substance abuse will often draw someone further in to the exclusion of other activities, including even basics such as grooming.


Addiction is a chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry. Although the pharmacological mechanisms for each class of drug are different, the activation of the brain’s reward system is similar across substances in producing feelings of pleasure or euphoria. Dysfunction in this system has biological, psychological, social and spiritual manifestations, says the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) (www.asam.org). Addiction is characterized by an inability to abstain from a substance, impaired behavioral control, craving, diminished recognition of significant problems with one’s