HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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Reports and recommendations from professional organizations such as the National Council on Youth Sports and federal agencies have increased public awareness of the health benefits associated with youth sports. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends school-age children participate in at least 60 minutes per day of moderate to vigorous physical activity that is age and developmentally appropriate and enjoyable.


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KEEPING THE FUN IN YOUTH SPORTS

How many pure recreational leagues do you see? Are there teams everyone can join and play regularly or are the options select, traveling teams and other teams that do not welcome all comers? Most sports medicine clinicians have seen some of the results of this push toward serious competition. Increasingly younger athletes come in with overuse injuries.


Encouraging regular exercise in children is important. If a young athlete finds playing sports fun rather than stressful, the likelihood child will continue to participate increases exponentially. Thus it is vital to constantly deliver the message that having fun is more important than winning in sports. How can we do this? One way is to make it clear what is important. What is the first thing you ask your children when they come home after a game? Was it “Did you win?” or was it “Did you have fun?” When you ask a child, “Did you win?” they learn winning is what you value most. That puts a lot of pressure on the child.


On the other hand, asking, “Did you have fun?” communicates your value is first on having fun. Members of the ACSM emphasize the importance of fun in sports. This embraces a value that promotes greater participation and enjoyment with physical activity and youth sport.  

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut and Professor, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Department of Gerontology, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller

The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) (2018) has emphasized the importance of youth participation in physical activity and sport programs. Noted among the benefits is the development of children and adolescents physically, mentally and socially. Paramount is the realization that engaging youth in organized sporting activities should be fun. It contributes to the physical and social development of long-term healthy lifestyles for children and adolescents.


Research has shown current youth have become a less active generation for a number of reasons. Clinicians and researchers point to the rise of technology, social media, computers and video games. Educators cite cuts in physical education programs in schools. There is another factor attributable to the decline of youth participating in sport programs – the shift of emphasis from fun to winning. What would your child say if you asked him which is more important, winning or having fun? Kids are more likely to say having fun.


What is behind youth choosing alternatives to sports today? If young people value having fun and learning in what they do, they will chose options they enjoy more. The latest technology is fun to play. Gamers compete against themselves in many cases, not with others. The value is in enjoying the challenge and playing the game more than winning the game.


Take a closer look at local youth sports programs in the community.