HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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During chemotherapy, Justin never took a sick day. It was a coping mechanism. “Being at work took my mind off of it,” says  Justin, a general manager at Panera. “At home, I would have melted away in my sorrow.” He admits it was tough, and there were days he probably should have called in sick, but thanks to understanding co-workers he could count on, Justin always made his way into work. He’s grateful he didn’t have to file for short-term disability – a 45 percent pay cut.


Besides the benefit of being able to continue working during chemo, receiving treatment close to home enabled him to rely on his vast support system. “Hundreds of people had my back whenever I needed it,” says Justin, who graduated from a local high school, Lafayette, attended UK and works at one of Panera’s busiest locations. His wife, brothers and parents – and the nurses at Baptist, he says – were especially supportive. “I always had someone with me and in the waiting room while I had chemo.”


“As soon as treatment is over, I don’t have to drive or fly home, and I’m not in a hotel room,” says Justin, who lives just a five-minute drive from Baptist. “I had the safety of my own home in terms of germs,” he adds, which was important because his immune system was compromised by the chemo.


Plus, there’s no place like home when it comes to comfort. “Your mental state is a huge part of fighting cancer,” he says. “Cleveland isn’t foreign, but it’s not home. When you’re at home, you’re happier. Your mind controls a lot more than you think.”


Mindset is something Justin cares about deeply, which is why he’s signed up for a peer-to-peer support group piloted at Baptist. It offers an outlet for cancer patients to share experiences in a positive environment. “You can’t understand what it feels like physically and emotionally until you’ve been through it,” says Justin. “Sometimes you need someone to say it’s going to be okay, and they want to hear your story.” It’s yet another example of Baptist’s comprehensive care — and it’s just a few minutes from Justin’s home.

When Justin was diagnosed with stage 3 Hodgkin’s lymphoma, family encouraged him to leave town for treatment. But after meeting with a Baptist Health Lexington oncologist, “I knew immediately that I wanted to stay here,” he says. With Baptist, Justin received lifesaving care without having to leave his life behind. “As soon as treatment was over, I got to go home, not to a hotel room,” Justin says. He was also able to keep working. “I never took a sick day, and I didn’t have to take a pay cut.” Today, Justin is in remission and moving forward with his life. At Baptist Health, we’re proud to offer people like Justin world-class care, that isn’t a world away. Learn more at BaptistHealth.com/CancerCare.


Justin was 28 when he was diagnosed with stage 3 Hodgkin’s lymphoma. It was everywhere.


He had ignored a lump under his collar bone for a few years. “At that age, you don’t think about lumps,” says Justin. “You think about girls and graduating college.”


One night, Justin thought his appendix had ruptured, so his wife took him to the ER. Appendicitis was ruled out, but it was determined that he had swollen lymph nodes. He was sent home with pain meds and instructed to follow up with his general practitioner, who noticed the lump and had it biopsied. That’s where Justin’s cancer journey began.

JUSTIN EVANS - CANCER SUCCESS STORY

BAPTIST HEALTH CANCER CARE


Within 30 minutes of receiving the biopsy results, Justin was in the office of Dr. Lee Hicks, oncologist with Baptist Health Lexington. He began chemo two days later. “Total time – one week before I started chemo,” says Justin.


“When I first got diagnosed, friends and family members wanted me to go to Cleveland Clinic and Houston,” he says. “When I met with my oncologist, Dr. Hicks, and he said, ‘Listen, here’s your treatment. It works. God willing with this treatment, you’re going to be fine,’ I knew he was going to take care of me. I wanted to stay here – at Baptist.”


Justin was ready for the battle with the help of his trusted network at Baptist, which included a multidisciplinary team of caregivers dedicated to treating the whole patient — body and mind.


At the outset of treatment, Justin was paired with a social worker who also happened to be his childhood babysitter, Angie  Pennington.  “Baptist, in its infinite wisdom, puts a social worker in the chemo ward,” Justin says. “Angie about lost it when I walked in.”