HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness



OTHER TIPS:


Eat beforehand. Don’t skip meals or fast in preparation for a feast. This way, you won’t arrive famished. Ideal pre-party snacks combine complex carbs with protein and unsaturated fat, such as apple slices with peanut butter or a slice of turkey and cheese on a whole wheat pita.


Don’t stand or sit next to the food table. This eliminates mindlessly reaching for food as you talk. If you know you’re prone to recreational eating, pop a mint or stick of gum in your mouth to prevent mindless eating.


Eat slowly. It takes at least 20 minutes for your brain to realize you’re full. Drink some water and recheck your appetite. You may find you are full or only want a small portion of second helpings.


Get moving. Dancing is a great way to work off holiday calories. At gatherings, suggest a walk before the feast, in between the meal and dessert or at the end of the repast.


Get plenty of rest. One of the best ways to maintain health, composure, and weight during the holidays is to stick to a regular sleep schedule. When we’re tired we tend to overeat because the hormone that tells us to stop eating is under-produced. We’re more stressed when we’re tired, which makes us produce more cortisol, which in turn can trigger eating. When we’re sleep deprived, we tend to prefer foods that are high in fats and sugar.

HOLIDAY HEALTHY EATING

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover

 They eat a variety of foods in moderate portions. Here are some facts about a few food choices from the ACSM:


Americans consume more than 22 million pounds of turkey every holiday season, says the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). But festive feasts don’t need to equal weight gain.


It’s not what we eat during the holidays that pack on the pounds; rather, it’s what we eat in between feasts throughout the year, says Nancy Darling, Ph.D. Most people gain about a pound or two during the holidays. To gain a pound, you must eat 3,500 additional calories. Five pounds requires 18,500 extra calories. About 14 percent of overweight and obese individuals gain five pounds or more during the holidays, says Darling.


The holidays can bring up both positive and negative emotions. It’s easy for many to overeat in response to emotions, says Darling. Food can evoke positive emotions that reduce anxiety and negativity. Recognize your holiday emotions and responses. Don’t allow yourself to fall into guilt about over-eating.


Exercising restraint during the holidays is best. Budget calories wisely. Don’t eat everything. Instead, eat your favorites in reasonable portions, Darling advises. Choose those foods you can’t enjoy other times of the year. Avoiding foods can backfire. The brain responds to thoughts of food by sending pleasure signals. Those who successfully lose and maintain weight do not avoid any foods in particular.