HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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GUM DISEASE COULD BE CAUSE AND CURE OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover

Bryce Vissel of the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia, concluded there isn’t sufficient data to suggest amyloid has a central or unique role in Alzheimer’s. Rather, amyloid seems to function as a sticky defense against bacteria, which has been found in the brains of individuals who had Alzheimer’s when they were alive.


Gum disease has been isolated as a known risk factor for Alzheimer’s. Research has found Porphyromonas gingivalis, the main bacterium involved in gum disease, invades and inflames brain regions affected by Alzheimer’s. Gum infections can worsen symptoms in mice genetically engineered to have Alzheimer’s, and it can cause Alzheimer’s-like brain inflammation, neural damage and amyloid plaques in healthy mice. But not everyone with P. gingivalis in their mouths will develop Alzheimer’s.


“The view that pathogens might be one of several paths leading to Alzheimer’s disease fits my current thoughts of amyloid and tau being critical brain responses to injury, instead of the initiators,” said George Perry at the University of Texas at San Antonio. “This is a further turning point in the understanding that infections and inflammation can be at the heart of Alzheimer’s disease.”

Dementia rates have skyrocketed among the aging population around the world. There are many types and causes of dementia, but Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form, accounting for between 60 percent and 70 percent of all cases.


Alzheimer’s disease results in progressive loss of memory and cognitive function. The condition usually involves the accumulation of two types of proteins in the brain – amyloid and tau. Common early symptoms of Alzheimer’s include short-term memory loss, apathy and depression, but these symptoms are often considered part of normal aging, making early diagnosis difficult. Imaging can rule out other forms of dementia, but a definitive diagnosis of Alzheimer’s is only possible after death, when examination of brain tissue can reveal whether a person had the deposits of amyloid and tau proteins characteristic of the condition. The vast majority of people with Alzheimer’s are diagnosed after age 65 years, but clumps of amyloid protein can begin to build up in the brain 10 to 20 years before symptoms appear.


Amyloid build-up forms large, sticky plaques and tau proteins become tangled. These are called plaques and tangles. Since 1984 it’s been theorized controlling these proteins was the key. But some individuals in their 90s have exceptional memories and brain plaques and tangles without any form of dementia.