HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

subscribe to Health & Wellness

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | BLOG | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

neotame and others. These are good alternatives to sugar. The association recommends people look into claims such as sugar-free, reduced sugar or no sugar added and see what the nutrition facts label really says.


There are healthy ways to add a little sugar to a beverage or food. Sugar is a perfect way to add some extra flavor to food such as whole-grain cereal or low-fat yogurt. Other options you may enjoy include fresh or dried fruits or natural juice. If you bake, cut the amount of sugar required in the recipe back by a third to a half. You will find you probably will not even notice the difference. Extracts such as vanilla, orange, lemon or almond can be excellent additions to recipes as well. Sometimes you can switch out sugar with unsweetened applesauce.


It can be hard to make a change overnight. If you’re accustomed to sugary drinks such as sweetened teas or sodas, cut back on them slowly. An easy way to do this is to mix half sweetened and half unsweetened while you adjust. Carrying a water bottle can make it easier to drink something that doesn’t contain sugar throughout the day. If you are not fond of the taste (or non-taste) of water, adding a slice of fruit can impart a touch of flavor. A smoothie that contains frozen fruits and/or vegetables is another great option and you can make your own at home.  

GOOD AND BAD SUGARS

JAMIE LOBER




Jamie Lober is a Staff Writer for Health & Wellness Magazine



Everyone can make an effort to be more mindful of what they’re eating. When you stay educated about what’s in various products, it becomes easier to ensure you put the best options in your body. What you eat can have a positive impact on your health if you choose wisely.

All sugars are not the same. Some occur naturally in fruits, vegetables and dairy products. Others are added during processing or preparation. One of the top sources of added sugars in the diet are sugary beverages and sweets. While both natural and added sugar is processed identically by the body, natural sugar is usually digested along with other good nutrients such protein, fiber, phytochemicals, vitamins and minerals and does not have negative effects on your health. Fiber in particular makes a difference because it slows the absorption of sugar and prevents the body from spiking your blood sugar.


The American Heart Association (AHA) encourages consumers to read nutrition facts labels and pay close attention when they list natural and added grams of sugar. Keep in mind there are many names for sugar. Many end in ose, such as maltose and sucrose, but other examples include high fructose corn syrup, raw sugar, honey, fruit juice concentrates and cane sugar. The AHA recommends limiting added sugars to no more than half of your daily discretionary calories allowance. The organization further breaks it down by suggesting women consume no more than 100 calories a day, or 6 teaspoons of sugar, and men consume 150 calories a day, or 9 teaspoons.


The American Diabetes Association says the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recognizes products that are safe for people with diabetes, such as saccharin, advantame, sucralose, aspartame,