GOING GLUTEN-FREE

Gluten is a particular kind of protein that is not found in eggs or meat but is in barley, rye, wheat and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye). Going gluten-free means avoiding these grains. A gluten-free diet is essential for those who have celiac disease, a condition that causes inflammation in the small intestines, or gluten allergies.  Symptoms of celiac disease include anemia, constipation or diarrhea, bloating, gas, headaches, skin rashes, joint pain and fatigue.

….FULL ARTICLE

A DIET FOR HEALTH & WEIGHT LOSS

Have you noticed? Look around and you’ll see a majority of Americans who are either overweight or obese. Look in supermarkets and you’ll see a plethora of food products, many of them processed or high-fat and/or sweet laden.  Consuming such a diet often leads to poor health and weight gain. It is not surprising that the leading cause of death in the United States is heart disease. A number of diseases, including pre-diabetes, diabetes, stroke and depression, are linked to how we eat .....

….FULL ARTICLE

ANTIBIOTICS IN OUR FOOD

Just what is in the food we eat? Considering the food chain, did you know adding antibiotics to food dates back to the 1940s? Antibiotic use has led to a dramatic reduction in illness and death from infectious diseases, yet there is a downside to this practice. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others encourage health care professionals and patients to use antibiotics more wisely and seek education and understanding about both the risks and benefits of using them.

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

Corn and rice based cereals are good alternatives, but read the labels carefully because some may contain malt.


The toughest part about going gluten free could be bidding farewell to bread. Other foods that will be off limits include croissants, hamburger buns, muffins, bagels, scones and pizza. Even pasta is usually made from wheat, so you need to avoid macaroni, spaghetti, shells and spirals if you are on a gluten-free diet. Instead, look for pasta made from corn, rice or quinoa.


Cakes, pies, cookies and other such treats need to be avoided as well because they are often loaded with wheat flour. To satisfy your sweet tooth, try gumdrops, plain hard candies and marshmallows.


Most beers are made with barley malt, though some gluten-free beers are available. Still, it is best to check with your doctor about whether these are safe for you. You can have numerous other gluten-free drinks, such as fruit juices, cider, port, liqueurs, fizzy drinks, cordials and sherry.

Gluten is a particular kind of protein that is not found in eggs or meat but is in barley, rye, wheat and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye). Going gluten-free means avoiding these grains. A gluten-free diet is essential for those who have celiac disease, a condition that causes inflammation in the small intestines, or gluten allergies.


Symptoms of celiac disease include anemia, constipation or diarrhea, bloating, gas, headaches, skin rashes, joint pain and fatigue. Some people who don’t have celiac disease may also have symptoms when they eat gluten; this is called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. These people may benefit from a gluten-free diet also.


Switching to a gluten-free diet is a huge change and it may take time to get used to it. However, these days you’ll find many products that are adequate substitutes for foods containing gluten. These products are often made with rice or potato flour instead of wheat products. Just check to be sure the label says the item is “100 percent gluten-free.”


Some foods have “stealth” gluten. You need to be careful about malt (made from barley) and hydrolyzed vegetable protein, which often contain wheat. Even some traditional breakfast cereals have gluten. While oats don’t contain gluten, they can increase symptoms such as bloating, diarrhea and abdominal pain.

GOING GLUTEN-FREE

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

more articles by harleena singh

Potatoes, rice, wine, eggs, fish, meat, fruits, vegetables and milk products are all gluten free. Such grains as arrowroot, amaranth, buckwheat, cornmeal, flax, millet, soy, sorghum, tapioca and teff and rice, soy, corn, potato and bean flour are all gluten free. But people with celiac need to avoid wheat products such as spelt, semolina, kamut, graham flour, farina and durum flour. They should also avoid food additives, such as malt flavouring, modified food starch and others.


Some medications and vitamins use gluten as a binding agent. Processed cheese (spray cheese, for example) may contain gluten, but real cheese is gluten free. Seasonings and seasoning mixes can contain gluten.


Even a little bit of gluten can be enough to cause symptoms for someone with celiac disease, so ensure you minimize the risk of cross contamination with gluten-containing foods. Wash down kitchen surfaces before use, use separate butter, spreads and jams to reduce crumbs and invest in some toaster bags to keep your gluten-free bread separate.


References: