FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: NOVEMBER 2018

Lab-Grown Meat Gaining Traction

More and more meat is being grown in labs from cultured cells. Several start-ups, such as Mosa Meat, Memphis Meats, SuperMeat and Finless Foods, are developing lab-grown beef, pork, poultry and seafood. This burgeoning niche industry is attracting millions in funding; Memphis Meats gobbled

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from our Food Bites Column

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FOOD BITES ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

FOOD BITES: SEPTEMBER 2020

Will Real Meat Become Obsolete?

Lab-grown meat, also known as in vitro meat, may soon be in your local grocery store. It could make meat production a new form of sustainable engineering. This type of “meat” is grown from stem cells harvested by biopsy from donor livestock and cultured in a lab for a few weeks. Products such as chicken nuggets, sausage and even foie gras could be created by this technique. Environmentalists believe in vitro meat could greatly reduce the environmental impact of large-scale animal husbandry, such as reducing greenhouse gas (most notably methane) by 96 percent. “Clean” meat is currently very expensive to produce, compared to the more traditional method of creating meat. It costs about $2,400 to make 450 grams of beef. As the technology matures and efficiency improves, these costs will likely fall dramatically.


Source:



Sugar and Your Immune System

Sugar has a number of harmful effects, including suppressing the immune system. While the sugar found in fruit or other natural sources can give the body a little boost, processed sugar tends to have unpleasant effects on the body. Consuming too much sugar can affect the cells in your immune system that target bacteria, researchers say.

Sugar can trigger low-grade inflammation in the body, which can contribute to chronic health conditions such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Research shows consuming 75 to 100 grams of a sugar solution can hinder the body’s immune functions. (Seventy-five grams is the equivalent of two cans of soda.) Suppression of the immune system starts as soon as 30 minutes after the consumption of sugar and can last up to five hours.


Source:



Pay Attention to Diet and Nutrition as You Fight COVID-19

In addition to social distancing and regular hand washing, an effective method of reducing the risk and spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is being more vigilant about your diet and nutrition. Nutrition is linked to the risk and severity of infections. Following a good-quality diet and taking a standard multivitamin/multimineral supplement have become particular- ly important during the pandemic. A good-quality diet emphasizes eating fruits, vegetables, whole

grains, legumes and nuts as well as moderate consumption of fish, dairy foods and poultry. It also advocates limited intake of red and processed meat, refined carbohydrates and sugar. This type of diet will provide appropriate amounts of healthy macronutrients and essential minerals and vitamins (especially C and D) to help you combat COVID-19. It will also ensure you have a sufficient number of immune cells and antibodies, which are important when your body responds to an infection. Even though you are isolated and tempted to binge on less-than-nutritious foods, this is not the time to go on a highly restrictive, crash diet. So continue to eat healthily and remember, no supplement contains all the benefits provided by healthy foods.

ANGELA S. HOOVER




Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.