FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: NOVEMBER 2018

Lab-Grown Meat Gaining Traction

More and more meat is being grown in labs from cultured cells. Several start-ups, such as Mosa Meat, Memphis Meats, SuperMeat and Finless Foods, are developing lab-grown beef, pork, poultry and seafood. This burgeoning niche industry is attracting millions in funding; Memphis Meats gobbled

….FULL ARTICLE

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FOOD BITES: OCTOBER 2020

Cancer-Fighting Foods to Add to Your Diet


It’s long been known that your diet can impact your health, whether negatively or positively. What foods have been touted as being good allies in the fight against cancer? Here are some you may want to add to your diet:


Apples.

Apples contain polyphenols – plant-based compounds that may prevent inflammation, cardiovascular disease and infections. These compounds have promising anticancer and tumor-fighting proper- ties. A 2018 study in the Journal of Food and Drug Analysis suggests apple phloretin significantly inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells without affecting normal cells.


Berries.

Berries are rich in vitamins, minerals and dietary fibers. Their antioxidant properties are beneficial in the battle against cancer. It has been shown that anthocyanin, a compound found in blackberries, lowers biomarkers for colon cancer. And blueberries have anti- inflammatory effects that have been shown to prevent the growth of breast cancer tumors in mice.


Carrots.

Carrots have high amounts of beta-carotene, which gives the

vegetables their distinct orange color. Recent studies have shown beta-carotene may prevent certain types of cancer. It has been linked to a reduction in the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Eating lots of carrots can result in a 26-percent lower risk of developing stomach cancer.


Cruciferous Vegetables.

These include broccoli, cauliflower and kale. They have been proven to contain sulforaphane, a plant compound with anticancer properties. Sulforaphane significantly inhibits cancer cell growth and stimulates cell death in colon cancer cells. In combination with genistein, a compound found in soybeans, sulforaphane significantly inhibits breast cancer tumor development and size. It also inhibits histone deacetylase, an enzyme with links to cancer development.


Fatty fish.

Salmon, mackerel and anchovies are all rich in essential nutrients, such as vitamin B, potassium and omega-3 fatty acids. One study suggests people who eat a diet high in freshwater fish have a 53-percent lower risk for colorectal cancer. Another study found people who took fish oil supplements at least four

times a week were 63 percent less likely to develop colon cancer than those who did not.


Grapes.

The skin of red grapes is a good source of an antioxidant called resveratrol. Grape juice and red wine also contain this antioxidant. According to the National Cancer Institute, resveratrol may be able to keep cancer from beginning or spreading. Lab studies have found that it limits the growth of many kinds of cancer cells.


Legumes.

Beans, peas and lentils are high in fiber. Studies show an association between higher legume consumption and a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer. Other study results indicate people who ate diets high in bean fiber were 20 percent less likely to develop breast cancer than those who did not meet their daily fiber intake. Pinto and red kidney beans are also good sources of antioxidants.


Nuts.

According to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR), all nuts exhibit cancer-preventing properties. Particularly helpful are walnuts. The AICR explains walnuts contain a substance called pedunculagin, which the body metabolizes into urolithins. Urolithins are compounds that bind to estrogen receptors and may play a role in preventing breast cancer.


Turmeric.

This spice, popular in Indian cuisine, contains an ingredient called curcumin that may be useful in reducing cancer risk. According to the American Cancer Society, curcumin can inhibit some cancer cells and slow the spread of cancer or shrink tumors in some animals.


Whole Grains.

The AICR advocates including whole grains in a cancer-combatting diet. Whole grains contain many components that might lower your risk of cancer, including fiber and antioxidants. Add oatmeal, barley, brown rice and whole wheat bread and pasta to your diet.



Sources:




ANGELA S. HOOVER




Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.