FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

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FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: NOVEMBER 2018

Lab-Grown Meat Gaining Traction

More and more meat is being grown in labs from cultured cells. Several start-ups, such as Mosa Meat, Memphis Meats, SuperMeat and Finless Foods, are developing lab-grown beef, pork, poultry and seafood. This burgeoning niche industry is attracting millions in funding; Memphis Meats gobbled

….FULL ARTICLE

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FOOD BITES: MAY 2021

Nanotechnology Targets Food at the Molecular Level


Scientists are trying to create specially designed particles to control the chemical reactions that make food palatable and enjoyable. They are working on manufacturing food that tastes salty without the health risks of adding salt and bread that contains healthy fish oil but without any fishy aftertaste. Nanotechnology is an emerging technology that creates and uses materials and particles at the scale of a nanometer – one billionth of a meter. Working with such small particles allows scientists to create materials and products with improved properties. Nanotechnology can help create many innovative food products and applications that change the way we process, preserve and package foods, such as designing smart packaging that can monitor the condition of foods while they are stored and transported. Israeli scientists found coating packaging paper with nano-sized silver particles combats bacteria such as E. coli and extends product shelf life. Most nanotechonological developments remain at the research and development stage for now. One big caveat in these endeavors is the negative reactions people already have against genetically modified foods. Another concern is concern whether ingested nanomaterials will migrate to different parts of the body and accumulate in certain organs, such as the liver and kidneys.


Source: The Conversation (www.theconversation.com/US)

Processed Meat Consumption Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia


Worldwide, the prevalence of dementia is increasing, and diet as a modifiable factor could play a role in that increase. British scientists, using data from nearly 500,000 people aged 40 to 69 years, discovered consuming a 25-gram serving of processed meat a day is associated with a 44-percent increased risk of developing dementia. But their findings also show eating some unprocessed red meat, such as beef, pork or veal, could be protective: People who consumed 50 grams a day were 19 percent less likely to develop dementia.  Some people were three to six times more likely to develop dementia due to well- established genetic factors, but the findings suggest the risks from eating processed meat were the same whether or not a person was genetically predisposed to developing the disease. The study, titled “Meat consumption and risk of incident dementia: Cohort study of 493,888 UK Biobank participants,” was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. It is believed to be the first large-scale study of participants over time to examine a link between specific meat types and amounts and the risk of developing dementia.

Vegan Diets Improve  Liver Function


In patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a vegan diet could improve liver function, according to research published in the Journal of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases. Researchers followed 26 participants with NAFLD who were on a vegan diet for six months. They tracked the subjects’ body weight, calorie intake and liver function. Results showed weight loss and improvements in liver enzymes toward normal levels. Increased consumption of plant-based foods improved antioxidant intake and gut microbiota that are beneficial to liver enzymes. These findings support plant-based dietary approaches for liver disease treatment and the prevention of associated chronic conditions including hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, or hepatocellular carcinoma.


Source: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (https://www.pcrm.org/news)

ANGELA S. HOOVER




Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.