FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: NOVEMBER 2018

Lab-Grown Meat Gaining Traction

More and more meat is being grown in labs from cultured cells. Several start-ups, such as Mosa Meat, Memphis Meats, SuperMeat and Finless Foods, are developing lab-grown beef, pork, poultry and seafood. This burgeoning niche industry is attracting millions in funding; Memphis Meats gobbled

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from our Food Bites Column

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FOOD BITES ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | BLOG | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

FOOD BITES: JUNE 2021

Food Insecurity Hit Five-Year High


The number of people facing acute food insecurity hit a five-year high in 2020 in countries beset by food crises, according to an annual report from the Global Network Against Food Crises. Conflict, economic shocks, COVID- 19-related restrictions and extreme weather pushed at least 155 million people across 55 countries and territories into acute food insecurity in 2020. At least 28 million people were deemed to be one step away from starvation. Countries in Africa remained disproportionally affected by acute food insecurity. “The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the fragility of the global food system and the need for more equitable, sustainable and resilient systems to nutritiously and consistently feed 8.5 billion people by 2030,” the report said. “If current trends are not reversed, food crises will increase in frequency and severity.” Acute food insecurity occurs when a person’s inability to consume adequate food puts their lives or livelihoods in immediate danger.


Source: United Nations World Food Programme (www.wfp.org)


Food Waste is a Growing Concern


A United Nations report estimates 17 percent of the food produced globally each year is wasted. That amounts to 1.03 billion tons of food. Food waste and obesity are major problems in developed countries.

They are both caused by an overabundance of food, but strategies to reduce one can inadvertently increase the other. Food waste refers to the loss of edible food that is not consumed for various reasons. It occurs at all levels of the supply chain, from farm to transportation, processing, retail and food service. Most of the waste (61 percent) happens in households. Food waste has become a growing concern because of the environmental toll of production, including the land required to raise crops and animals, and the greenhouse gas emissions produced along the way. Experts say improved waste tracking is the key to finding ways to ease the problem, such as programs to divert inedible scraps to use as animal feed.


Source: The Independent (www.independent.co.uk)


Can a Pink Drink Improve Exercise Performance?


A new study led by the Centre for Nutraceuticals at the University of Westminster shows pink drinks can help you run faster and farther, compared to clear drinks. The researchers found a pink drink can increase exercise performance by 4.4

percent and can also increase a feel-good effect that can make exercise seem easier. The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, is the first investigation to assess the effect of drink color on exercise performance and provides the potential to open a new avenue of future research in the field of sports drinks and exercise. During the study, participants were asked to run on a treadmill for 30 minutes at a self-selected speed. Throughout the exercise, they rinsed their mouths with either a pink or clear artificially sweetened drink that was low in calories. Both drinks were exactly the same. The results show that the participants ran an average 212 meters farther with the pink drink while their mean speed during the exercise test also increased by 4.4 percent. The pink drink participants found running more enjoyable. The role of color in gastronomy has received widespread interest.


Source: Science Daily (www.sciencedaily.com)

ANGELA S. HOOVER




Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.