FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

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FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

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FOOD BITES: NOVEMBER 2018

Lab-Grown Meat Gaining Traction

More and more meat is being grown in labs from cultured cells. Several start-ups, such as Mosa Meat, Memphis Meats, SuperMeat and Finless Foods, are developing lab-grown beef, pork, poultry and seafood. This burgeoning niche industry is attracting millions in funding; Memphis Meats gobbled

….FULL ARTICLE

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FOOD BITES: JUNE 2019

Hip Hop Music Ages the Funkiest-Flavored Cheese

For six months, Swiss cheese maker Beat Wampfler and a team of researchers from the Bern University of Arts played different songs unceasingly to cheese wells to see how sound waves impact flavor. They used a mini transducer that sent the sound waves directly into 22-pound Emmental cheese wheels. Classical cheese heard Mozart’s The Magic Flute. Rock cheese listened to Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven.” Ambient cheese heard Yello’s “Monolith.” The techno cheese heard Vril’s “UV,” and the hip-hop cheese received A Tribe Called Quest’s “(We’ve Got) Jazz.” After aging, food technologists from the ZHAW Food Perception Research Group examined the cheeses, concluding the cheese exposed to music had a milder flavor compared to non- musical cheese. They also found the hip-hop cheese had a stronger aroma and flavor than the other samples, saying it was “remarkably fruity, both in smell and taste, and significantly different from the other samples.” Next a jury of culinary experts sampled the cheeses during two rounds of blind taste tests. Most preferred the hip-hop cheese. The cheeses will undergo a biomedical survey to see if there are actual structural differences between them. A veterinarian by day and cheesemaker in his free time, Wampfler suspects unexpected things can affect the flavor and texture of a cheese. “Bacteria is responsible for the formation of the taste of cheese, with the enzymes that influence its maturity,” he said. “I am convinced that humidity, temperature or nutrients are not the only things that influence taste.

Sounds, ultrasounds or music can also have physical effects.” The field of sonochemistry looks at the effect of sound on solid bodies. Wampfler envisions a day when cheeses can be marketed based on the music they matured to. Individuals are already requesting cheeses matured to the blues, Balkan music and AC/DC.


Global Study: One in Five Are Eating Themselves to Death

Millions of people are dying around the world from poor diets loaded with sodium and lacking whole grains and fruits, says the Global Burden of Disease study published in the Lancet journal in April. One in five deaths globally in 2017– about 11 million – were linked to unhealthy eating habits, say the researchers. The people who had poor diets did not consume enough nuts, seeds, milk and whole grains and ate too much processed meat, sodium and sugary drinks. “This study affirms what many have thought for several years – that poor diet is responsible for more deaths than any other risk factor in the world,” said study author Dr. Christopher Murray of the University of Washington. The deaths included about 10 million from cardiovascular disease, 813,000 from cancer and nearly 339,000 from type 2 diabetes. The United States ranked 43rd on the list of deaths related to poor diet with 171 deaths per 100,000. The leading dietary risk


factor for death and disease for Americans is low intake of whole grains, found to be below 125 grams a day. The highest rates were found in Uzbekistan, Afghanistan and the Marshall Islands. The countries with the lowest rates of diet-related deaths were Israel, France, Spain and Japan.

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

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