FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: NOVEMBER 2018

Lab-Grown Meat Gaining Traction

More and more meat is being grown in labs from cultured cells. Several start-ups, such as Mosa Meat, Memphis Meats, SuperMeat and Finless Foods, are developing lab-grown beef, pork, poultry and seafood. This burgeoning niche industry is attracting millions in funding; Memphis Meats gobbled

….FULL ARTICLE

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FOOD BITES: JULY 2019

U.S. Cancer Cases and Unhealthy Diets

About 5 percent of U.S. cancer cases have been linked to a poor diet, according to a study published in the journal JNCI Cancer Spectrum in May of this year. These diets were characterized by low intakes of whole grains, dairy, fruits and vegetables and high intakes of processed meats, red meats and sugar-sweetened beverages. Colorectal cancer was most strongly related to diet (about 38 percent of total colorectal cancer cases). Next in prevalence were cancers of the mouth, pharynx and larynx (14,400 cases); uterine cancer (3,165 cases); and postmenopausal breast cancer (3,060 cases). Adults aged 45 to 64 years had the highest proportion of diet-related cancers.


Common Food Additive Linked to Insulin Resistance

The food additive propionate, which prevents mold growth and is widely used as a preservative in cheese, baked goods, bread and artificial flavorings, could alter metabolism in ways that may increase the risk of diabetes, according to a preliminary study in humans and mice. In mice, consumption of propionate led to high blood sugar levels in the short term and weight gain and insulin resistance in the long term. Humans who consumed propionate experienced temporary increases in insulin resistance over the space of a few hours. These results were published in the journal Science Translational Medicine in April.

Can’t Skip Magnesium If Taking Vitamin D

If you wonder if you’re getting enough vitamin D, you should rather consider if you’re getting enough magnesium, according to a review article published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association in March. Magnesium aids in the metabolism or activation of vitamin D so it can be used by the body. Vitamin D is not really useful without magnesium, according to study co-author Mohammed Razzaque, professor of pathology at Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine in Pennsylvania. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends 310-320 mg of magnesium a day for women and 400-420 mg a day for men. Some studies have found people with higher magnesium intakes have higher bone mineral density and a lower risk of osteoporosis. Foods high in magnesium include almonds, bananas, broccoli, brown rice, cashews, fish oil, flaxseed, milk, mushrooms, nuts, oatmeal, some seeds (pumpkin, sesame, sunflower), soybeans, sweet corn, tofu and whole grains. When taking magnesium supplements, do not consume more than the recommended amount. Too much magnesium from dietary supplements can cause diarrhea, nausea and abdominal cramping. Extremely high doses can lead to irregular heartbeat and cardiac arrest, according to the NIH.


ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover