FOOD BITES: OCTOBER 2017

U.S. Obesity Rates Begin to Level

After years of increasing, adult obesity rates remained stable in 45 states from 2015 to 2016, according to a new report from the Trust for America’s Health, a nonprofit health advocacy organization, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a philanthropic organization that funds health research.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: SEPTEMBER 2017

Tomatoes No Longer Considered ‘Poison Apples’

Originating in Mesoamerica, tomatoes were part of the Aztecs’ diet as early as 700 A.D., but they weren’t grown in Britain until the 1590s. First arriving in southern Europe in the early 16th century via Spanish conquistadors returning from Mesoamerica, the tomato was considered a “poison apple”

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: DECEMBER 2017

Milk Proteins Make Edible  Wrapping

To create an all-around better packaging solution, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is developing environmentally friendly film made of the milk protein casein to wrap meats, cheese and other food items. “The protein-based films are powerful oxygen blockers that help prevent food spoilage,”

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from our Food Bites Column

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FOOD BITES ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | DIRECTORY | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

FOOD BITES: FEBRUARY 2017

Understanding Sticker Codes on Produce


The Price Look Up (PLU) codes on the stickers placed on fruits and vegetables reveal important information. A four-digit code that begins with a 3 or 4 means the produce was grown with modern-day agronomic techniques. This means plenty of fertilizer and pesticides. A 5-digit code beginning with the number 8 means the produce is genetically modified. The most prevalent genetically modified fruits are bananas, papayas and melons. A 5-digit code beginning with the number 9 means the produce was grown without pesticides and is not genetically modified or engineered. These items were grown and harvested using old farming methods and fall under the criteria of organic. There is no law that requires a PLU code on produce, so when you see no code, the item is not organic and other than that, there’s no information available as to where or how it was grown or harvested.


Legumes More Satiating Than Pork


Meals based on legumes such as beans and peas increase fullness more than pork or veal based meals, according to a study at the University of Copenhagen’s Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports. High-protein diets have been found to lead to weight loss. In this study, released

this past December, participants ate 12 percent fewer calories when the proteins were legumes. The researchers conclude diets high in legumes could help with weight loss.The results were published in the journal Food & Nutrition.


Nuts Cut May Health Risks


A large analysis of current research by Imperial College London and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology shows individuals who eat at least 20 grams of nuts a day have a lower risk of heart disease, cancer and many other diseases. This is the equivalent of just a handful of nuts. Coronary heart disease risk is reduced by 30 percent, cancer risk by 15 percent and risk of premature death by 22 percent, according to the analysis of all current studies on nut consumption. This small amount of daily nut consumption is also associated with a reduced risk of dying from respiratory disease by about a half and diabetes by nearly 40 percent.


“In nutritional studies, so far much of the research has been on the big killers such as heart diseases, stroke and cancer, but now we’re starting to see data for other

diseases,” said study co-author Dagfinn Aune with the School of Public Health at Imperial. “We found a consistent reduction in risk across many different diseases, which is a strong indication that there is a real underlying relationship between nut consumption and different health outcomes. It’s quite a substantial effect for such a small amount of food.” This includes all kinds of tree nuts, such as hazelnuts and walnuts, and peanuts, which are actually legumes. “Nuts and peanuts are high in fiber, magnesium and polyunsaturated fats – nutrients that are beneficial for cutting cardiovascular disease risk and which can reduce cholesterol levels,” Aune said. “Some nuts, particularly walnuts and pecans, are also high in antioxidants, which can fight oxidative stress and possibly reduce cancer risk.” Even though nuts are quite high in fat, they are also high in fiber and protein, and some evidence suggests nuts might actually reduce your risk of obesity over time. The study further found eating more than 20 grams of nuts per day does not further improve health outcomes. The results were published in the journal BMC Medicine.

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover