FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: NOVEMBER 2018

Lab-Grown Meat Gaining Traction

More and more meat is being grown in labs from cultured cells. Several start-ups, such as Mosa Meat, Memphis Meats, SuperMeat and Finless Foods, are developing lab-grown beef, pork, poultry and seafood. This burgeoning niche industry is attracting millions in funding; Memphis Meats gobbled

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from our Food Bites Column

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FOOD BITES ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by PurplePatch Innovations

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | CALENDAR | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

subscribe to Health & Wellness

FOOD BITES: DECEMBER 2018

Virtual Reality Can Alter Taste

The environment in which we eat is just as important as taste, say Cornell University researchers. Food scientists used virtual reality to demonstrate how people’s perception of real food can be altered by their surroundings. “When we eat, we perceive not only just the taste and aroma of foods, we get sensory input from our surroundings – our eyes, ears, even our memories about surroundings,” said Robin Dando, associate professor of food science and senior author of the study. Identical samples of bleu cheese were perceived to be more pungent in certain virtual reality settings. Such testing offers convenience and flexibility as compared to building physical environments. “This research validates that virtual reality can be used, as it provides an immersive environment for testing,” said Dando. “Visually, virtual reality imparts qualities of the environment itself to the food being consumed, making this kind of testing cost efficient.”


Immigrants’ Microbiome Quickly Westernizes: Study

Researchers have found evidence that the gut microbiota of Southeast Asian immigrants to the United States rapidly Westernize – but detrimentally. After immigration, the loss of gut microbiome (the population of beneficial microbes living in humans’ intestines) diversity and function predispose immigrants to metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. “We found immigrants begin losing their native microbes almost immediately after arriving in the U.S. and then acquire alien microbes that are more common in European-American people,”

said senior author Dan Knights, a computer scientist and quantitative biologist at the University of Minnesota. “The new microbes aren’t enough to compensate for the loss of the native microbes, so we see a big overall loss of diversity.” It has been previously been shown people in developing nations have a much greater diversity of bacteria in their gut microbiome than people living in the United States. “It was striking to see this loss of diversity actually happening in people who were changing countries or migrating from a developing nation to the U.S.,” Knights said. First author Pajau Vangay added, “Obesity was a concern that was coming up a lot for the Hmong and Karen communities here.


In other studies, the microbiome had been related to obesity, so we wanted to know if there was potentially a relationship in immigrants and make any findings relevant and available to the communities.” Knights, Vangay and their team compared the gut microbiota of Hmong and Karen people still living in Thailand, Hmong and Karen people who had immigrated to the United States and the children of those immigrants with Caucasian American controls. They also were able to follow a group of 19 Karen refugees as they relocated from Thailand to the United States, which meant they could track how the refugees’ gut

micro-biomes changed longitudinally in their first six to nine months in the United States. It turned out significant changes occurred that quickly, and the Westernization of bacteria strains continued over the course of the first decade in the United States. The changes were more pronounced in their children.


Although the research didn’t establish a cause-effect relationship between the microbiome changes in immigrants and the immigrant obesity epidemic, it did show a correlation between greater Westernization of the microbiome and obesity. The research was published in the journal Cell.

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover