FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: NOVEMBER 2018

Lab-Grown Meat Gaining Traction

More and more meat is being grown in labs from cultured cells. Several start-ups, such as Mosa Meat, Memphis Meats, SuperMeat and Finless Foods, are developing lab-grown beef, pork, poultry and seafood. This burgeoning niche industry is attracting millions in funding; Memphis Meats gobbled

….FULL ARTICLE

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FOOD BITES: DECEMBER 2020

We Still Eat Too Many Carbs and Too Much Fat


Americans are still eating too many low- quality carbohydrates and fats, says a recent study published in the journal JAMA Network. An international team of researchers examined adult dietary habits and found Americans are cutting back on low-quality carbohydrates, but intake remains high at over 40 percent, while the consumption of saturated fat remains well above the national recommendation.


“Although there are some encouraging signs the American diet improved slightly over time, we are still a long way from getting an ‘A’ on this report card,” said coauthor Fang Fang Zhang, a nutrition researcher at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University.


Source: Food Science News (www.foodscience.news)


Good Nutrition is a “Seatbelt for Your Health”


The connection between the pandemic and dietary habits is undeniable. The stress of isolation, coupled with a struggling economy, has caused many to seek comfort with old friends such as Big Mac, Tom Collins and Ben and Jerry. Overindulging in this kind of food and drink might not just be affecting your waistline. It could potentially put you at greater risk of illness by hindering your immune system.

There is a clear relationship between a balanced diet and a strong, well-regulated immune system. A healthy immune system is our best defense against coronavirus infection. Proper nutrition is an absolute must, especially now. Although it’s not a replacement for medicine, good nutrition can work synergistically with medicine to improve vaccine effectiveness, reduce the prevalence of chronic disease and lower the burden on the health care system. The Western diet typically has a high proportion of red meat, saturated fat and “bliss point foods” that are full of sugar and salt. A high amount of refined sugar in the diet can cause chronic, low-grade inflammation in addition to diabetes and obesity. Many Americans don’t consume nearly enough of the essential nutrients the body needs to function properly, such as vitamins A, C and D and the minerals iron and potassium. Adequate fruit and vegetable consumption is missing from the American diet. A healthy immune system responds quickly to limit or prevent infection, but it also promptly turns down the dial to avoid damaging the cells of the body. Think of good nutrition as a seatbelt for your health; it doesn’t guarantee you won’t get sick, but it helps to ensure the best outcomes.

Excess Egg Consumption Can Increase Risk of Diabetes


Eggs are a popular breakfast food all over the world, but the health benefits of eating eggs might not be all they’re cracked up to be. New research from the University of South Australia shows excess egg consumption can increase your risk of diabetes. The study assessed egg consumption in a large sample of Chinese adults. It found people who regularly consumed one or more eggs per day increased their risk of diabetes by 60 percent. The effect was also more pronounced in women than in men. Over the past few decades, China has undergone a substantial nutritional transition that has seen many people move away from a traditional diet comprising grains and vegetables to a more processed diet that includes greater amounts of meat, snacks and energy-dense food. At the same time, egg consumption has also been steadily increasing; from 1991 to 2009, the number of people eating eggs in China nearly doubled.


Source: Science Daily (www.sciencedaily.com)

ANGELA S. HOOVER




Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.