FOOD BITES: JULY 2018

Magnesium Treats Depression

As little as 248 mg of magnesium per day leads to an astounding reversal of depression syndrome, according to research conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and published in the journal PLoS One in June 2017.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2018

Source of Yuma E. Coli Romaine Found

Federal officials first announced on April 13 an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown and produced in the Yuma, Ariz., area. Federal investigators found the source of the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 on July 28: canal water.

….FULL ARTICLE

FOOD BITES: NOVEMBER 2018

Lab-Grown Meat Gaining Traction

More and more meat is being grown in labs from cultured cells. Several start-ups, such as Mosa Meat, Memphis Meats, SuperMeat and Finless Foods, are developing lab-grown beef, pork, poultry and seafood. This burgeoning niche industry is attracting millions in funding; Memphis Meats gobbled

….FULL ARTICLE

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FOOD BITES: AUGUST 2020

A Road Map for FODMAPs

If you frequently have bloating, gas or abdominal pain after eating certain foods, FODMAPs could be to blame. FODMAP stands for fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols. This group of carbohydrates is found abundantly in many plant foods. During digestion, enzymes break the bonds in the carbohydrate molecules so they can be absorbed in the small intestine. You may be sensitive to FODMAPs, and that’s what causes your gastrointestinal distress. The natural process that occurs in the colon when your gut bacteria quickly ferment FODMAPs and produce gasses such as hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane can cause serious discomfort for some people, especially those who have digestive disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Surprisingly, healthy foods tend to exacerbate the problem. To check if you have a FODMAP sensitivity, keep a food diary for a few weeks to monitor your reactions and identify suspect foods. It may help to cut down on foods such as apples, pears, peaches, broccoli, cauliflower, kidney beans and wheat. Eliminating these foods will minimize the amount of water drawn into the intestines during digestion and reduce fermentation action in the gut. Try low-FODMAP alternatives such as blueberries, oranges, strawberries, peppers, potatoes, spinach, rice, quinoa, tofu and pumpkin seeds. Bloating that doesn’t go away or worsens may be the result of another condition, so keep monitoring your symptoms and let your doctor know about any unusual or uncomfortable changes. Consult a dietitian or nutritionist for help in developing a beneficial, specific-to-you meal plan.

Coffee Has Varying Degrees of Bitterness

Compounds contained in coffee, such as caffeine, contribute to the beverage’s bitterness to varying degrees. A recent study conducted by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology and the Technical University of Munich offered new insights into the molecular interactions between bitter substances and bitter receptors. The latest findings from a study conducted by the Freising team of scientists confirm this interaction. Using a cell-based testing system, the team investigated five different bitter coffee constituents. Based on the results of their study, the research team assumed two of the 25 human bitter taste receptors respond to coffee’s constituents. Further studies conducted by the researchers suggest the bitter substances contained in coffee interact with each other. Many people do not have the bitter taste receptor TAS2R43 due to a genetic variation. This could explain the differences in individual coffee taste perception.


Source:



ANGELA S. HOOVER




Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.