HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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athletes building muscle is a complex process, and more protein does not equal bigger muscles. Teen athletes need about 0.4-0.6 grams of protein per pound of body weight every day, and there is nothing wrong with adding a protein shake to their routine after a game or practice to meet that need. While high-performance mixes can get very expensive, young athletes are served well by simpler blends. Casein, whey and soy are the most common sources of protein in commercial mixes. Any of these can aid in post-game recovery. Try putting a few scoops in a blender bottle before school for a just-add-water boost after practice. However, beware – protein shakes are not known for their crowd-pleasing tastes.


While a good post-game snack is a great way to refuel for more exercise tomorrow, keep in mind the most important aspect of sports nutrition for any athlete, young or old, is a balanced diet complete with plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and healthy fats. Eat well and play hard.


References


Sports are a great way for kids to get out of the house, make new friends and burn off some of that seemingly unlimited energy. But all that energy has to come from somewhere.


For a young athlete, most of the energy needed for a soccer match or basketball game (high-intensity exercises) comes from carbohydrates stored in skeletal muscle, known as glycogen. Glycogen is the high-octane fuel bodies use for athletic moves such as running and jumping, but a long game can use up most of the glycogen stored in muscles. In most circumstances, lunch or dinner provides the needed nutrition to restore glycogen and prepare young bodies for the next game. However, on days with doubleheaders or overtimes, young athletes can benefit from the extra boost that comes with a post-game snack geared for restoring muscle glycogen and priming muscles for the next round. Most research suggests about 50 grams of carbohydrate and 12 grams of protein per 100 pounds eaten within the first 45 minutes after a game will optimize the body’s ability to recover after hard work (Alghannam, Gonzalez, & Betts, 2018). Here are some ideas for a quick bite to refuel:


Chocolate milk.

Although chocolate milk has too much sugar to be considered a great snack on most days, that extra sugar is useful after a game. Low-fat choco- late milk has the right ratio of carbohydrates and protein, boasts an excellent mix of muscle-build- ing amino acids and deserves a place in sports nutrition (Lunn, Pasiakos, Colletto, Karfonta, Carbone,

EAT WELL AND PLAY HARD

DAVE SCHNELL, PH,D


more articles by Dave Schnell

Anderson and Rodriguez, 2012). Make sure to watch the portions, though – 8 to 12 ounces is about right for child athletes.


Banana with Peanut Butter.

Bananas are a great source of nutrition for tired athletes. On their own, bananas are a healthy source of natural sugars, fiber, vitamins and minerals, and they pair perfectly with peanut butter for added protein. As an added bonus, bananas are high in potassium, an electrolyte important to muscle function lost in sweat.


Cottage Cheese with Fruit.

Cottage cheese is high in protein and sodium, both of which are needed after a long, sweaty game. Add healthy, tasty, glycogen-restoring sugars by mixing in fruits such as peaches, pears, mangos or berries. Remember to keep portions in check – one serving of cottage cheese is just half a cup.


Protein Shakes.

Older kids may see their teammates using protein powder and recovery shakes and want to try them in an effort to “bulk up.” It is important to remind growing