HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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time alone or if they are very driven and then stop taking on new projects, try to lend support and talk to them. Talking to teachers or your pediatrician about what is going on can be helpful.


There are five stages of grief. You may not experience them in the exact order or you may go back and forth between the various stages before finally reaching the final stage of acceptance. The first stage is denial and isolation. This is where people numb their emotions as a defense mechanism. It is usually a temporary reaction.


The second stage is anger, when the new reality and pain begin to show. You may be mad at the person for having passed away, even though that is not reasonable. You may be mad at friends or even strangers. The third stage is bargaining, which is how people attempt to regain control of their life. It is a stage where you may consider what, if anything, could have been done to save your loved one. The fourth is depression. This is to be expected. It can involve frequent bouts of crying as you reflect on your loss. The fifth stage is acceptance.  

GRIEF 101: DONT RUSH THROUGH THE HEALING PROCESS

JAMIE LOBER




Jamie Lober is a Staff Writer for Health & Wellness Magazine

Professionals added another stage called testing to these five stages. Testing is where you look for ways to cope and may even try new things with the hope they will improve your outlook and bring you peace. Self-care is critical. Take care of yourself and your needs first and do things you consider relaxing. Stay away from alcohol, drugs and anything that can harm your body. It is not uncommon to become preoccupied with the fear of new responsibilities or weight gain or have panic attacks, experience trouble adapting or have difficulty finding meaning. Eventually, when you accept the loss, you are acknowledging that your pain is normal and you had a deep love and attachment to the person you lost.


Never be ashamed about your feelings and do not put a timeline on yourself. You may grieve for weeks, months or years, and it is all okay. Comfort should stem from spending time with those who care about you, facing your emotions and maintaining hobbies as best you can. In time you will be able to look back and see how brave and strong you were as you created a new normal.


Bluegrass Grief Care says grief can come in waves. It can be triggered by specific things or nothing at all.


They offered some strategies for coping, such as:


Everyone experiences a significant loss at some point in their life. There are many forms of grief; in addition to death, you can grieve a divorce or job loss. The American Psychological Association (APA) says research shows most people can recover from loss on their own through the passage of time if they have social support and healthy habits. Some people benefit from grief support groups, which can be in person or online. It can be particularly difficult if you have lost a spouse or parent. You may find yourself engulfed in shock or confusion from the trauma. The APA says people are naturally resilient, but sometimes a psychologist or mental health professional with expertise in dealing with grief can be a good aid for healing.


Communication is the key. It is healthy to talk about the person and the loss. Avoiding the situation can keep you from going through a smoother healing process. Incomplete grief occurs if you are not showing outward signs of grieving and are unwilling to talk about your loss. You can manifest the grief physically through body aches, stomach troubles, headaches or lack of energy. Every person heals at their own pace, so you cannot compare your grief process to someone else’s. If you were close to the person who died or had a complicated relationship with them, this can add extra stress to your recovery.


With children, you want to consider what is typical behavior for them. If a child is outgoing but becomes withdrawn or starts spending more