HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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health. The higher the levels on these two measures – blood glucose and A1C – the greater your risk of developing diabetes complications. Take the time to meet with your healthcare provider to learn more about your blood glucose levels and your A1C if you need help improving those numbers.


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DIABETES MANAGEMENT BY THE NUMBERS

blood sugar readings after a meal should be about < 180 mg/ dL (10 mmol/L).


People with diabetes should also know their A1C. Hemoglobin is the protein found in red blood cells that gives blood its color and carries oxygen throughout the body. The HgbA1C (glycosylated hemoglobin) test is commonly referred to as one’s A1C. The A1C goal for people without diabetes is less than 6 percent. However, for people with diabetes, the goal is less than 7 percent. The A1C percentage corresponds with an actual blood glucose level. For example, an A1C of 7 percent is equal to an average blood sugar level of 154 mg/dL (8.6 mmol/L), and an A1C of 10 percent is equal to a blood sugar level of 240 mg/dL (13.3 mmol/L). Current recommended levels of blood sugar and A1C equal to 7.0 is recommended. This is a key number because it reflects a person’s overall blood sugar control.


It is wise to seek ways to manage your diabetes. That includes diet, exercise, medication and daily diligence of blood sugar levels. If you are unsure about your numbers, discuss them with your health care provider. Knowing your numbers will give you a much better understanding of how well you are managing your diabetic

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP



Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period. The pancreas no longer produces enough insulin or the cells stop responding to the insulin that is produced, so glucose in the blood cannot be absorbed into the cells. Symptoms often include frequent urination, lethargy, excessive thirst and hunger.


Diabetes is the No. 1 cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations and adult blindness. More than 30 million American adults have diabetes, and one in four of them don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States.


High blood glucose readings are the most obvious symptom of uncontrolled diabetes. As diabetes raises blood sugar levels, some individuals with diabetes may think it is normal to have high blood glucose. However, diabetes is a manageable disease. The secret is knowing your numbers. The American Diabetes Association recommends people with type 2 diabetes aim for blood sugar levels that are as close to normal as possible. This is called tight control. The better your blood glucose control is, the less likely you are to have diabetes-related health complications that may include kidney, eye, brain and nerve damage, as well as the potential for heart attacks and strokes (vascular damage).


Blood sugar or glucose levels are read on a glucometer. Readings before a meal should be around 70-130 mg/dL (5.0-7.2 mmol/L), while