HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

….FULL ARTICLE

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles on health and wellness issues

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FEATURE ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

subscribe to Health & Wellness

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | BLOG | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

says the ADA. Good oral hygiene and regular professional deep cleanings by a dentist can help lower HbA1c levels. (This is the average level of blood sugar over the previous three months, which indicates how well diabetes is being managed.) Controlling blood sugar levels will help oral health. This means taking diabetes-related medications as directed, switching to a healthier diet and increasing exercise. Good blood sugar control helps the body fight bacteria or fungal infections in the mouth and relieves dry mouth caused by diabetes. Health care providers should be aware of the oral health risks of patients with diabetes, and dentists should be aware of how their patients are managing their diabetes.

 


SOURCES


Websites



Journals


DIABETES CAN AFFECT ORAL HEALTH

ANGELA S. HOOVER





Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

Diabetes in July 2018. Secondary diabetic complications or microvascular complications include damage to the eyes, leading to blindness; kidneys, leading to renal failure; and nerves, leading to diabetic foot disorders, including severe infections causing amputation and impotence. A more recent study published in February in the journal Diabetes Spectrum found the rates of missing teeth, removable prostheses and periodontal inflammation was high among hospitalized patients with diabetes.


Those with diabetes can also experience inflamed gums that lead to bleeding (gingivitis). Another oral symptom that can occur in people with diabetes is dry mouth, which is caused by a lack of saliva. Saliva protects the teeth. Having less saliva poses a higher risk of developing cavities. Dry mouth can also make it difficult to taste food. Diabetes can lead to delayed wound healing throughout the body, including the mouth. And in children with diabetes, the teeth may erupt at an earlier age than is typical, according to the ADA.


Regular visits to the dentist are important for everyone and more so for people with diabetes. Research suggests treating gum disease can help improve blood sugar control in patients with diabetes, decreasing the progression of the disease,

Approximately 34.2 million Americans, or 10.5 percent of the population, have diabetes, according to the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation. This figure includes approximately 7.3 million people who are undiagnosed.


Diabetes can affect every part of the body, even when it’s being well-managed. Untreated, diabetes can cause serious problems, including taking a toll on the teeth and oral health in general.


Even the healthiest person has more bacteria living in their mouth than there are people on the planet. If these bacteria become prolific in the gums, they can cause periodontal disease, a chronic, inflammatory disease that can destroy the gums. People with diabetes are more prone to gum disease, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). Poor management of blood sugar increases the risk for gum problems. Conversely, as with all infections, serious gum disease may make blood sugar rise. This makes diabetes harder to control since it makes the person more susceptible to infections and less able to fight the bacteria invading the gums.


It is hard to know which is the cause and which is the effect. High levels of gingival inflammation was found in subjects with type 1 diabetes despite regular dental visits and limited secondary diabetes complications, according to a study published in the journal