HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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CORONAVIRUS AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF THE SAFETY SIGNAL

The urgency has created stress for all ages, resulting for some in disabling fear, a hallmark of anxiety and stress-related disorders. Researchers at Yale University and Weill Cornell Medicine report on a novel way to help combat the anxiety experienced at times such as these, when life events such as the spread of COVID-19 trigger excessive fear and the absence of a safety signal. In humans, a symbol or a sound not associated with adverse events can relieve anxiety by accessing an entirely different brain network than that activated by fear and worry. Every person must find their own safety signal, whether that is a mantra, a song, a person or even an item such as a stuffed animal that represents safety and security for them.


The CDC (www.cdc.gov), WHO and other reputable agencies advocate addressing the coronavirus by:


DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP



Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

With the COVID-19 global pandemic, the World Health Organization (WHO) (www.who.int) has asked countries to take urgent and aggressive action. World leaders continue to hold international teleconferences with health officials to address the most effective ways to protect the public and develop health policies for the coronavirus, which has caused multiple illnesses and deaths worldwide.


The virus is thought to spread mainly from person to person through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people nearby or can be inhaled into the lungs. There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus.


While it’s still unclear exactly how much of the current coronavirus outbreak has been fueled by asymptomatic, mildly symptomatic or pre-symptomatic individuals, the risk of contagion exists. A yet-to-be-published article in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s journal, “Emerging Infectious Disease,” reports the time between cases in a chain of transmission is less than a week. More than 10 percent of patients are infected by someone who has the virus but does not yet have symptoms, according to Dr. Luren Meyers, a professor of integrative biology at the University of Texas Austin, who was part of a team of scientists from the United States, France, China and Hong Kong examining the viral threat.