PAP SMEAR: TEST LOOKS FOR PRESENCE OF PRECANCEROUS CELLS

A Pap smear is a procedure that screens for cervical cancer. Most women should start getting Pap smears at age 21 years and every three years after. It should be a part of your annual physical exam. The test looks for the presence of precancerous or cancerous cells on the cervix, the opening of the uterus or womb. During the procedure, cells from the cervix are scraped away. It is not painful and takes less than 10 minutes to complete. You may bleed a little after the test is completed.

….FULL ARTICLE

WHAT IS A MEDICARE WELLNESS EXAM?

A Medicare Wellness Exam is a preventative screening visit your provider wants you to have once a year. This visit is free and is separate from your annual physical exam (if your plan covers annual physicals). Traditional Medicare does not pay for a physical – it only covers a Wellness Exam.  What is a Wellness Exam? The visit is covered once every 12 months (11 full months must have passed since your last visit). It is designed to help prevent disease and disability based on your current health....

….FULL ARTICLE

ORAL HERPES

Oral herpes is an infection caused by a specific type of the herpes simplex virus. This condition, also called HSV-1 or sometimes cold sores or fever blisters, creates painful sores on your lips, gums and tongue, as well as the roof of your mouth and sometimes the inside of your cheeks. It may even affect your nose and chin. Symptoms of oral herpes include swelling in the lymph nodes, fever, tiredness and aching muscles. While the initial infection with oral herpes occurs most often in children ages 1-2 years, ….

….FULL ARTICLE

Use the buttons below to scroll through more great articles from our Family Doc Column

MORE ARTICLES

Be Sociable, Share!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Delicious Share on Digg Share on Google Bookmarks Share on LinkedIn Share on LiveJournal Share on Newsvine Share on Reddit Share on Stumble Upon Share on Tumblr

MORE FAMILY DOC ARTICLES

CONTACT INFORMATION

© Health & Wellness Magazine - All rights reserved | Designed and Maintained by Aurora Automations LLC.

MORE FROM ROCKPOINT PUBLISHING

HEALTH & WELLNESS MAGAZINE

HOME | FEATURE ARTICLES | COLUMNS | DIGITAL ISSUES | BLOG | RACE RUNNING CALENDAR | ABOUT | CONTACT

CATCH UP ON YOUR CHILD'S VACCINATIONS

rotavirus, which spreads quickly through daycares.


Vaccines are important not only for keeping your child(ren) well, but they also decrease the spread of disease and thus help the general population stay healthy. For example, children are immunized against rubella to protect pregnant women. Adults and teens who are vaccinated against pertussis protect more susceptible babies. Diseases that were once rare could reemerge if large numbers of children aren’t vaccinated against them. The CDC recommends vaccination against 16 life-threatening diseases. Children should begin receiving their vaccines early in life. These vaccinations include hepatitis B, DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis), MMR (measles, mumps and rubella), IVP (protects against polio) and varicella (protects against chicken pox). In addition, most children should receive a flu shot each year.


And what about you, Mom and Dad? Are you caught up on your screenings as well? You may have put off your mammogram, pap smear or colonoscopy while in isolation, but now you can (and should) set up an appointment to get them done. You can also discuss with your primary care physician other necessary

screenings, such as a prostate cancer screening for men age 50 years and older (or 40 years for African-American men) and bone density testing for women age 65 years and older. Adults need some vaccinations, too – including the varicella zoster vaccine for shingles and the pneumococcal vaccine for pneumonia. Now that it’s available, be sure to get both COVID-19 vaccinations on schedule (research is still going on for a COVID-19 vaccine for children younger than 16 years).


We’ve put it off long enough. Let’s all get caught up on our vaccines and preventative care!

JENNIFER BATTEN, APRN.

Jennifer Batten, APRN, is originally from Cynthiana, Ky. She is married to her 8th grade sweetheart and has two daughters. Jennifer received her bachelor’s degree in nursing in 2004 and her master’s degree from Eastern Kentucky University in 2017. She worked for over 12 years as a neonatal, nursery, pediatric and ICU nurse. Jennifer enjoys pediatric medicine, preventive medicine, urgent care, weight management and women’s health. She can see patients of all ages. Jennifer is available for new patient visits and preventive adult visits, as well as annual physicals and routine office visits. She will see patients primarily at our Brannon Crossing office at 615 East Brannon Road.

The pandemic paused many things, including keeping up with your child’s regular vaccination schedule. Some parents were understandably reluctant to take their children out of the house to get their checkups and vaccinations during the pandemic. The good news is you can get back on track.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has created a vaccine catch-up schedule so you can work with your primary care physician to design an efficient vaccination plan for your child(ren). The CDC reported in May 2020 that fewer children were receiving their vaccines. One study showed only half as many childhood shots had been given in 2020 as there had been during the same time period in 2019.


But now that the infection rate of COVID has decreased, you can bring your child in to see their pediatrician to assess what vaccines they need immediately. Vaccinating babies is especially important because they are vulnerable to various life-threatening infections. Your pediatrician will assess if your child is still within the recommended age range for the vaccines they missed. Sometimes individual circumstances make some vaccines more critical than others. Children who have heart or lung problems face a higher risk from respiratory illnesses such as the flu. Children with certain underlying medical conditions, such as sickle cell disease or diabetes, should be vaccinated against pneumococcus promptly. Infants in daycare will need early protection against