EYEGLASSES MAKE A FASHION STATEMENT

According to the Vision Council of America, approximately 75 percent of adults wear some sort of vision correction. People wear eyeglasses for different reasons. Some people are nearsighted and cannot see objects far away, while other people are farsighted and cannot see objects close by. Eyeglasses offer corrective vision for people who have difficulty seeing.

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LOCAL SPOTLIGHT - KENTUCKY HEALTH SOLUTIONS

It is that most wonderful time of the year—no, we are not talking about Christmas. It’s Medicare’s Annual Enrollment Season. Yes, it’s the time of the year when we stress and spend hours on the phone or online shopping for health coverage. The pain of having to shop health coverage, spend hours on the phone or online with one company vs another for our health insurance can be a daunting task. It does not matter if you are on Medicare or looking for your personal insurance, this can be one of the most….

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DO YOU HAVE 20/20 VISION

When you consider what defines healthy eyes, among the criteria is good vision. The American Optometric Association says the term 20/20 vision is used to express normal visual acuity (the clarity or sharpness of vision) measured at a distance of 20 feet. If you have 20/20 vision, you can see clearly at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity is usually measured with a Snellen chart. It’s likely everyone has seen the Snellen chart – usually starting with a huge “E,” .....

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Genetically modified foods bring some controversy to today’s consumer. Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) can be defined as plants, animals or microorganisms in which the genetic material (DNA) has been altered in a way that does not occur naturally by mating and/or natural recombination. When a gene from one organism is purposely moved to improve or change another organism in a laboratory, the result is a GMO. This is also sometimes called “transgenic” for transfer of genes. There are different ways of moving genes to produce desirable traits. Foods produced from or using GMOs are often referred to as genetically modified (GM) foods.


If you’ve eaten anything today, chances are you had GMOs. GM foods are made from soy, corn or other crops grown from seeds with genetically engineered DNA. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, GM seeds are used to plant more than 90 percent of the corn, soybeans, and cotton grown in the United States. Unless you consciously avoid them, GM foods likely find their way into many of your snacks and meals.


Nine genetically modified crops are available today, including corn (both sweet and field), soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya, potatoes and squash. GM apples have been approved and will be commercially available this fall. The National Center for Food and

ARE YOU EATING GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD?

Agricultural Policy estimates 85 percent of U.S. corn is genetically modified.


Some clinical researchers believe genetically modified foods are safe, healthy and sustainable, while others claim the opposite. GMOs are engineered to give food more color, increase their shelf life or eliminate seeds. That’s why we can buy seedless watermelons and grapes. Some GM foods also have been engineered to have higher levels of specific nutrients, such as protein, calcium or folate. Proponents of GM foods contend genetic engineering can help us find sustainable ways to feed people in third world countries. Specifically, in countries that lack access to nutrient-rich foods, using GM crops provides nutrient-enriched food for their population.


Learn more about GM foods through information provided by the World Health Organization on its Website, www.who.int. You’ll get an overview of many of the main issues and concerns about consuming these foods for human health. The Web site also lists risks and benefits and discusses how such foods are regulated nationally and internationally.  

DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller