FIVE THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT DEPRESSION IN WOMAN

Life has numerous turns and twists. Women encounter many stages of growth and change, from puberty and menstruation to giving birth to menopause. All these rites of passage create emotional ups and downs. Because of these factors, women may have a greater susceptibility to depression. Indeed, depression occurs in women at approximately twice the rate of men.

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MAINTAINING MENTAL WELL-BEING IN STRESSFUL JOBS

David Brabon is a plastic surgeon. In his practice at Rockcastle Hospital and Respiratory Center in Mount Vernon, Ky. – the largest respiratory care center in the United States – he removes skin cancers from faces and hands and rebuilds shattered noses, among other tasks. He has learned to not only encourage others but to maintain his own mental well-being.

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CALMING THE MIND THROUGH CONSCIOUS BREATHING

A calm mind is worth its weight in gold, especially in this day and age. There are more bills, emails, tweets, kids running around and relationships in need of time than ever before. Everybody needs to learn how to catch their breath and relax.  Techniques using the breath to calm the mind have been around forever. While these techniques are widely known and accessible, many people feel they don’t even have the time to learn about them, let alone develop a daily practice.

….FULL ARTICLE

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Just what is in the food we eat? Considering the food chain, did you know adding antibiotics to food dates back to the 1940s? Antibiotic use has led to a dramatic reduction in illness and death from infectious diseases, yet there is a downside to this practice. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others encourage health care professionals and patients to use antibiotics more wisely and seek education and understanding about both the risks and benefits of using them.


Nearly 80 percent of the antibiotics sold in the United States are used in meat and poultry production. The vast majority are given to healthy animals to promote growth or prevent disease in unsanitary conditions. The meat and poultry production industries argue there is no harm in this practice and insist they are in compliance with that policy from the past century.


The critical question is whether antibiotic use in animals promotes the development of hard-to-treat antibiotic-resistant superbugs that make people sick. Could current usage in animals pose a serious threat to human health? The Consumers Union has concluded the threat to public health from the overuse of antibiotics in food animals is real and growing. Humans are at risk both due to the potential presence of superbugs in meat and poultry and to the general migration of

ANTIBIOTICS IN OUR FOOD

superbugs into the environment, where they can transmit their genetic immunity to antibiotics to bacteria for which there are currently no immune capabilities.


Several health organizations, including the American Medical Association, the American Public Health Association, the Infectious Disease Society of America and the World Health Organization, have called for significant reductions in the use of antibiotics for animal food production.


Sources and Resources


DR. THOMAS W. MILLER, PH.D, ABPP

Thomas W. Miller, Ph.D., ABPP, is a professor emeritus and senior research scientist, Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention, University of Connecticut; retired service chief from the VA Medical Center; and tenured professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky.

more articles by Dr thomas w. miller