HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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The first step toward overcoming alcoholism is admitting you have a problem. There are a variety of treatment options and resources available that can help someone with AUD, as well as his or her family. Quitting on your own (“cold turkey”) is generally not recommended for a deeply entrenched addiction. Detox can be life threatening.


Perhaps the best known and most effective treatment for AUD is Alcoholics Anonymous (www.aa.org), a fellowship made up of recovering alcoholics who are dedicated to helping others learn to quit drinking and stay sober. They know exactly what you’re going through because they have been there themselves. Group members talk about their own drinking and the trouble they got into and share how they stopped. There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership. The only requirement is a desire to stop drinking.


The stark truth is, if you have a problem with alcohol and keep on drinking, it will get worse – never better – until you realize you need to stop drinking. But only you can decide when that time has come – when, as A.A. says, you get sick and tired of being sick and tired.


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ALCOHOL ADDICTION

According to www.addiction.com, alcoholism is a chronic disease in which excess drinking of alcohol makes it difficult for a person to live a healthy life – physically, mentally and emotionally.


Alcoholism is the second most common form of substance abuse, affecting an estimated 17 million adults and 855,000 adolescents in the United States, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol addiction affects people from all walks of life. A family history of addiction to alcohol puts a person at higher risk for developing AUD. Children of parents who have trouble with alcohol have a fourfold increased risk of developing the disorder. Psychological, genetic and behavioral factors can all contribute to AUD.


Physical manifestations of alcohol addiction include tremors, sweats and feeling sick to your stomach. Alcohol addiction can result in heart disease and liver disease, in addition to ulcers, diabetes, sexual dysfunction and brain damage. Women who drink heavily are at higher risk of developing breast cancer and osteoporosis. Drinking is also associated with an increased incidence of suicide and homicide.

A drinking problem can range from mild to moderate to severe. Some people can drink socially, practicing restraint and self-control. Other people cannot seem to stop drinking once they start, and they keep drinking even when they suffer consequences such as hangovers, illness, alienating family and friends, blacking out or getting arrested for DUI. Some of the warning signs that alcohol is adversely affecting your life include:



Alcoholism is also referred to as alcohol use disorder, or AUD.